The Hiking Thread

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Vrede too
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:00 pm

billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:36 am
Ours pretty much have free reign of the neighborhood while we sleep. Does that count?

We have 3 vacant lots on our waterfront street. One partially wooded waterfront lot and two low lying densely wooded lots directly across the street. The bears spend a lot of time in the two wooded lots.

The two guys who started clearing one of the lots early last week were appreciative that we told them about the bears, but for some reason, they haven't been back.
Could be you, except for the mountains:


¡Qué calor!: Una familia de osos se cuela entre bañistas en un lago
What heat!: A family of bears is strained (?) between bathers on a Lake (Tahoe)


They should have yelled, air-horned, whatever as soon as mom went for the picnic table. "A fed bear (and her cubs) is a dead bear."
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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billy.pilgrim
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:14 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:00 pm
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:36 am
Ours pretty much have free reign of the neighborhood while we sleep. Does that count?

We have 3 vacant lots on our waterfront street. One partially wooded waterfront lot and two low lying densely wooded lots directly across the street. The bears spend a lot of time in the two wooded lots.

The two guys who started clearing one of the lots early last week were appreciative that we told them about the bears, but for some reason, they haven't been back.
Could be you, except for the mountains:


¡Qué calor!: Una familia de osos se cuela entre bañistas en un lago
What heat!: A family of bears is strained (?) between bathers on a Lake (Tahoe)


They should have yelled, air-horned, whatever as soon as mom went for the picnic table. "A fed bear (and her cubs) is a dead bear."

they still haven't come back to finish clearing the lot
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Vrede too
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:23 pm

billy.pilgrim wrote:
Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:14 pm
they still haven't come back to finish clearing the lot
You should go check for remains just in case they did come back and got et.
Vrede too wrote:
Mon Aug 20, 2018 2:15 pm
...I've never had or used a bear canister, don't think I would unless mandatory. I'm not sure about above treeline trips, bears usually won't be there unless there's something like a ladybug hatch going on....
:lol: Never mind.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5CsWFvGpHc
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Whack9 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:15 am

Has anyone here ever foraged for wild mushrooms?

I understand there's a lot to be wary of when it comes to this, however there's a few types that are relatively easy to identify.

- Chicken of the woods. Doesn't really have any look alikes here in the southeast. Grows on trees.
- Chanterelles. The only potential "false chanterelle" look alike is the jack o lantern mushrooms. Chanterelles don't grow in cluters like Jack's, they don't grow out in the open and typically grow somewhat near trees. A key distinguishing feature is either no gills or false gills. If true gills are present, it's not a chanterelle and most likely a jack.
- morels - don't recall ever seeing these in the wild, but they're super easy to ID.

I dont know of any others at the moment.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:24 am

Whack9 wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:15 am
Has anyone here ever foraged for wild mushrooms?

I understand there's a lot to be wary of when it comes to this, however there's a few types that are relatively easy to identify.

- Chicken of the woods. Doesn't really have any look alikes here in the southeast. Grows on trees.
- Chanterelles. The only potential "false chanterelle" look alike is the jack o lantern mushrooms. Chanterelles don't grow in cluters like Jack's, they don't grow out in the open and typically grow somewhat near trees. A key distinguishing feature is either no gills or false gills. If true gills are present, it's not a chanterelle and most likely a jack.
- morels - don't recall ever seeing these in the wild, but they're super easy to ID.

I dont know of any others at the moment.
I'm pretty sure that puffballs are safe. A big one makes for really nice "steaks". Not counting magic mushrooms, I've always foraged with someone more expert than me.
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:34 am

Vrede too wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:24 am
Whack9 wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:15 am
Has anyone here ever foraged for wild mushrooms?

I understand there's a lot to be wary of when it comes to this, however there's a few types that are relatively easy to identify.

- Chicken of the woods. Doesn't really have any look alikes here in the southeast. Grows on trees.
- Chanterelles. The only potential "false chanterelle" look alike is the jack o lantern mushrooms. Chanterelles don't grow in cluters like Jack's, they don't grow out in the open and typically grow somewhat near trees. A key distinguishing feature is either no gills or false gills. If true gills are present, it's not a chanterelle and most likely a jack.
- morels - don't recall ever seeing these in the wild, but they're super easy to ID.

I dont know of any others at the moment.
I'm pretty sure that puffballs are safe. A big one makes for really nice "steaks". Not counting magic mushrooms, I've always foraged with someone more expert than me.

Only the one I explained on p 13, this thread

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:36 am

Despite Lady O having taken a seminar on mushroom foraging several years ago, the only ones we've ever really harvested were chanterelles. Man, those are good!

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Whack9 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 1:06 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:24 am
Whack9 wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:15 am
Has anyone here ever foraged for wild mushrooms?

I understand there's a lot to be wary of when it comes to this, however there's a few types that are relatively easy to identify.

- Chicken of the woods. Doesn't really have any look alikes here in the southeast. Grows on trees.
- Chanterelles. The only potential "false chanterelle" look alike is the jack o lantern mushrooms. Chanterelles don't grow in cluters like Jack's, they don't grow out in the open and typically grow somewhat near trees. A key distinguishing feature is either no gills or false gills. If true gills are present, it's not a chanterelle and most likely a jack.
- morels - don't recall ever seeing these in the wild, but they're super easy to ID.

I dont know of any others at the moment.
I'm pretty sure that puffballs are safe. A big one makes for really nice "steaks". Not counting magic mushrooms, I've always foraged with someone more expert than me.
Yeah probably a good idea.

Puffballs are easily distinguished, but for a novice it may be possible to mistake a young deathcap for a puffball.

A good way to ID whether or not the shroom is truly a puff ball is to take a nibble and If you get sick and die you know it's actually a death cap and isn't safe to eat.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Fri Aug 24, 2018 2:01 pm

Whack9 wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 1:06 pm
Yeah probably a good idea.

Not really an idea, just how it's worked out. I never took a class or bothered to self-teach. Nothing against mushroom hunting, but for me it's like fishing - If I'm outdoors I'd rather keep moving.

Puffballs are easily distinguished, but for a novice it may be possible to mistake a young deathcap for a puffball.

A young deathcap would be too small for me to bother with given how big puffballs get.

Image

Rule of thumb: If it looks like a dick, it probably is one. ;) Or:
Puffball Edibility and identification

While most puffballs are not poisonous, some often look similar to young agarics, especially the deadly Amanitas, such as the death cap or destroying angel mushrooms. It is for this reason that all puffballs gathered in mushroom hunting are cut in half lengthwise. Young puffballs in the edible stage, before maturation of the gleba, have undifferentiated white flesh within; whereas the gills of immature Amanita mushrooms can be seen if they are closely examined....
A good way to ID whether or not the shroom is truly a puff ball is to take a nibble and If you get sick and die you know it's actually a death cap and isn't safe to eat.
:D :thumbup:

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Whack9 » Tue Aug 28, 2018 5:19 pm

Things to do in the Charleston SC area? Hikes, bikes, kayaking etc etc etc?

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:39 pm

Whack9 wrote:
Tue Aug 28, 2018 5:19 pm
Things to do in the Charleston SC area? Hikes, bikes, kayaking etc etc etc?
Harbor tour, maybe by kayak? Fort Sumter? Warship/s, I think. Beautiful old town.

It's been a long, long time.
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:46 pm

Tour the battleship is fun, as is Folly Beach.
If you're going to yak, though, I'd suggest doing the Edisto River before you get to Charleston. Good outfitter on 15 near Canadys, here... http://www.edistotreehouses.com/ Rent, or they'll transport if you've got your own.

Great place to stay is James Island park. https://www.ccprc.com/1434/Campground
Bike trails, fishing, dog park

Walking downtown around the Battery and docks is fun, too. Excellent food available.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:17 pm

Had a great ride today on the Heritage Rail Trail out of York PA down toward Maryland. Really good path. The railroad was built before the civil war and was a main transportation route to Gettysburg. Lincoln stopped there on his way to Gettysburg for his speech. The only thing they run on the railroad now is an ancient steam engine with 1800's cars for recreational rides. They also use it for re-enactments, including Lincoln's speech. Highly recommend it if anybody goes close to south/central PA or north central Maryland.

https://www.traillink.com/trail/heritag ... unty-park/

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by GoCubsGo » Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:27 pm

O Really wrote:
Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:17 pm
Had a great ride today on the Heritage Rail Trail out of York PA down toward Maryland. Really good path. The railroad was built before the civil war and was a main transportation route to Gettysburg. Lincoln stopped there on his way to Gettysburg for his speech. The only thing they run on the railroad now is an ancient steam engine with 1800's cars for recreational rides. They also use it for re-enactments, including Lincoln's speech. Highly recommend it if anybody goes close to south/central PA or north central Maryland.

https://www.traillink.com/trail/heritag ... unty-park/

Image
Nice. You ever checked out the Virginia Creeper Trail?

http://www.vacreepertrail.us
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:03 pm

Yep. Done the Creeper the entire 30-something miles, though not all at the same time. Two legs - down to Damascus and Abingdon-Damascus. One of my all-time favorites.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:57 pm

While I'm thinking about it - if anyone isn't using the AllTrails app for finding/tracking hikes, you probably want to try it. alltrails.com

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:35 pm

Trail runner kills attacking mountain lion 'in self-defense,' authorities say

A runner killed a mountain lion "in self-defense" after the animal attacked him along a trail in northern Colorado on Monday afternoon, authorities said.

The unnamed man heard something behind him on the West Ridge Trail at Horsetooth Mountain Open Space in Fort Collins and was attacked as he turned around. The mountain lion lunged at him, biting into his face and wrist, according to a press release from Colorado Parks and Wildlife....
So, I'm waiting for the part where he pulled out his gun and shot it. Instead:
After further investigation, including an examination of the cougar, wildlife officials determined that the man was able to suffocate the animal while defending himself from the attack....
Wow. This is a modern day Daniel Boone story, except it really happened.

Comment:
"The trail runner has been identified as Chuck Norris."
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:12 pm

I suppose "suffocate" is technically correct, but apparently what he did was choke the cat. Man, can you imagine grabbing a mountain lion by the neck and holding on until he's dead? Would have taken at least a couple of minutes, I'd think. Now there's a prop bet for you - how long to choke the mountain lion.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:22 pm

No, I can't imagine it. After breaking free I'm sure I would have reverted to the yelling, sticks and rocks strategy - perhaps unsuccessfully.
O Really wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:12 pm
I suppose "suffocate" is technically correct, but apparently what he did was choke the cat....
I wondered. So, I looked it up:
suffocate

to kill by preventing the access of air to the blood through the lungs or analogous organs, as gills; strangle.
to impede the respiration of.
I guess the word is more generalized than I thought.
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by neoplacebo » Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:57 pm

O Really wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:12 pm
I suppose "suffocate" is technically correct, but apparently what he did was choke the cat. Man, can you imagine grabbing a mountain lion by the neck and holding on until he's dead? Would have taken at least a couple of minutes, I'd think. Now there's a prop bet for you - how long to choke the mountain lion.
The story I saw on ABC earlier says the lion was a young one, but still, I wager it would take at least 90 seconds to choke the beast, all the while dealing with a writhing, clawing, squirming mass of natural hell, both combatants knowing it is a fight to the death. Seeing it was in Colorado, if it had been me, I'd head straight to the local pot shop and bar to convey my story in an appropriate way. :D

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