The Food Thread

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GoCubsGo
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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:06 am
OK, so I know - everybody believes "their" barbeque is the best. But after several years of having St. Louis dry rub ribs as my favorite, I've got a new favorite - Santa Maria style tri-tip barbeque. One example here... https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bob ... pe-2014974

Tender beef tip of sirloin, cooked on red oak fire, with simple but tasty seasoning. Delicious.
That looks really good (maybe I'm just hungry), what time should we be over?

You have a grill you tote around?
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Re: The Food Thread

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I pack a grill from Lowe's (Char-Broil) that is easy to move around, light, does a decent job for a portable gas grill, and can be replaced as necessary.
But I couldn't cook "real" barbeque on it. Does a great job of grilling fish, though.
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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:47 am
I pack a grill from Lowe's (Char-Broil) that is easy to move around, light, does a decent job for a portable gas grill, and can be replaced as necessary.
But I couldn't cook "real" barbeque on it. Does a great job of grilling fish, though.
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Guessing you don't want to deal with charcoal, but the Weber Smokey Joe's can do anything a large kettle can do. Love em!

Apparently they also make a great portable electric grill too.

https://www.weber.com/US/en/grills/port ... oe-series/
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Re: The Food Thread

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GoCubsGo wrote:
Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:46 pm

Guessing you don't want to deal with charcoal, but the Weber Smokey Joe's can do anything a large kettle can do. Love em!

Apparently they also make a great portable electric grill too.
No, I don't want to deal with charcoal, but I had a Weber kettle for years and loved it. If you know what you're doing with the charcoal, and know how to use the vent, you can turn out consistently excellent food. Heat it up for some nice crusty-rare-in-middle steaks, cool it down and get it smoky and do a whole turkey. IMNVHO, any gas-fired grill is inferior to a real charcoal or wood grill, but it does suit our life much better.

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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Fri Nov 22, 2019 12:11 am
GoCubsGo wrote:
Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:46 pm

Guessing you don't want to deal with charcoal, but the Weber Smokey Joe's can do anything a large kettle can do. Love em!

Apparently they also make a great portable electric grill too.
No, I don't want to deal with charcoal, but I had a Weber kettle for years and loved it. If you know what you're doing with the charcoal, and know how to use the vent, you can turn out consistently excellent food. Heat it up for some nice crusty-rare-in-middle steaks, cool it down and get it smoky and do a whole turkey. IMNVHO, any gas-fired grill is inferior to a real charcoal or wood grill, but it does suit our life much better.
I've got both and have made thanksgiving turkey on my kettle since about 1990. No better way to make it.
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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Fri Nov 22, 2019 12:11 am
GoCubsGo wrote:
Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:46 pm

Guessing you don't want to deal with charcoal, but the Weber Smokey Joe's can do anything a large kettle can do. Love em!

Apparently they also make a great portable electric grill too.
No, I don't want to deal with charcoal, but I had a Weber kettle for years and loved it. If you know what you're doing with the charcoal, and know how to use the vent, you can turn out consistently excellent food. Heat it up for some nice crusty-rare-in-middle steaks, cool it down and get it smoky and do a whole turkey. IMNVHO, any gas-fired grill is inferior to a real charcoal or wood grill, but it does suit our life much better.
I have a Kingsford covered BBQ that looks like a big egg. It did great on a turkey one year. Perfect shape for radiating heat back onto the bird evenly. I've also done a rotisserie turkey (max 15 lb) on the gas grill; that also comes out great. Personally though, I'm not super fond of turkey. I think chicken is much better - more tender and flavorful if done right. Also have a New Braunfels horizontal smoker. That also works well but for birds I prefer the Kingsford or the rotisserie. The smoker is good for pork and lamb. Of course anything with charcoal requires more attention than gas. Although one time I had a visitor from my high school days, and I got distracted showing her around the place and forgot to tend the chicken in the Kingsford egg. Turned out perfect: as the coals gradually died down the bird got very very tender. And juicy. Hard to duplicate, though!

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Re: The Food Thread

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I'm seeing more and more reports about antibiotic resistant infections.

Take Action: Urge FDA to bring all antibiotics under vet oversight now

Then, there's ocean depletion.

Act Now: Protect U.S. Fisheries and Fishermen
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Re: The Food Thread

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"When you can make people believe absurdities, you can make them commit atrocities."
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Re: The Food Thread

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Fake news, the sea can't run out of fish, said every republican on the face of the earth, immediately after telling stories about all the big fish and big catches of days gone by.

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Re: The Food Thread

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Yo billy.p - do you know this place? Mr. Pollo in Pensacola.
https://www.yelp.com/biz/mr-pollo-pensacola

It's rated #61 on Yelp's best 100 places to eat.
To determine Yelp’s Top Places to Eat in 2020, Yelp’s data science team pulled the top restaurants by ratings and number of reviews in 2019 across the U.S., with representation based on each place’s share of top-rated restaurants nationally, then curated the list with the expertise of our Community Managers around the country to finalize the rankings. The result is a list as quirky, interesting and unique as the Yelp Community itself.

#1 is a San Diego food truck where we got the house specialty chicken shawarma a couple of weeks ago. It was really good, but we had no idea we were eating at the top place in the country. Glad we went when we did - probably won't be able to get near the place for a while. https://www.yelp.com/biz/shawarma-guys-san-diego

Only WNC place on the list was Sunny Point Cafe in Asheville, #91.
https://www.yelp.com/biz/sunny-point-ca ... -asheville

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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:06 pm
Yo billy.p - do you know this place? Mr. Pollo in Pensacola.
https://www.yelp.com/biz/mr-pollo-pensacola

It's rated #61 on Yelp's best 100 places to eat.
To determine Yelp’s Top Places to Eat in 2020, Yelp’s data science team pulled the top restaurants by ratings and number of reviews in 2019 across the U.S., with representation based on each place’s share of top-rated restaurants nationally, then curated the list with the expertise of our Community Managers around the country to finalize the rankings. The result is a list as quirky, interesting and unique as the Yelp Community itself.

#1 is a San Diego food truck where we got the house specialty chicken shawarma a couple of weeks ago. It was really good, but we had no idea we were eating at the top place in the country. Glad we went when we did - probably won't be able to get near the place for a while. https://www.yelp.com/biz/shawarma-guys-san-diego

Only WNC place on the list was Sunny Point Cafe in Asheville, #91.
https://www.yelp.com/biz/sunny-point-ca ... -asheville

Never been but I'll give it a try

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Re: The Food Thread

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Woman's Valentine heart cookies come out looking like a scrotum and balls.
https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/woman-g ... 20327.html

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Re: The Food Thread

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I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/

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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:36 pm
I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/
I'll take your word for it. The concept is ludludicrous.
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Re: The Food Thread

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GoCubsGo wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 4:19 pm
O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:36 pm
I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/
I'll take your word for it. The concept is ludludicrous.
I agree, what is this "leftover wine" that you speak of?


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Re: The Food Thread

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O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:36 pm
I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/
Ooof.

Considering that until relatively recently some unscrupulous purveyors of wine would adulterate their offerings with a lead compound to make it taste sweeter. It was lead acetate, called sugar of lead. Postulated as one of the reasons for the fall of the Roman empire. But apparently still added to some wines in the 20th century. No, I don't have any proof of that, but I'd be wary of slurping up any old wine absent provenance.
Buh-Bye, President Plump...

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Re: The Food Thread

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Ulysses wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:30 pm
O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:36 pm
I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/
Ooof.

Considering that until relatively recently some unscrupulous purveyors of wine would adulterate their offerings with a lead compound to make it taste sweeter. It was lead acetate, called sugar of lead. Postulated as one of the reasons for the fall of the Roman empire. But apparently still added to some wines in the 20th century. No, I don't have any proof of that, but I'd be wary of slurping up any old wine absent provenance.
Who would ever do that?

Unrestrained capitalism is a bitch.

I not going to try to find this, both were heard on NPR several years ago

60% of the catfish sold in Mississippi (our biggest catfish producing state) at these all you can eat catfish restaurants located all over the state were raised in Asia.

I'm guessing bomb craters make good catfish ponds in viet nam.

And

Since we have no approved definition of honey, anything goes. if you didn't see it come out of the hive, then chances are its syrup that came from china in 55 gallon drums with a tad of real honey added for flavor by some guy in America - all perfectly legal

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Re: The Food Thread

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:51 pm
Ulysses wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:30 pm
O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:36 pm
I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/
Ooof.

Considering that until relatively recently some unscrupulous purveyors of wine would adulterate their offerings with a lead compound to make it taste sweeter. It was lead acetate, called sugar of lead. Postulated as one of the reasons for the fall of the Roman empire. But apparently still added to some wines in the 20th century. No, I don't have any proof of that, but I'd be wary of slurping up any old wine absent provenance.
Who would ever do that?

Unrestrained capitalism is a bitch.

I not going to try to find this, both were heard on NPR several years ago

60% of the catfish sold in Mississippi (our biggest catfish producing state) at these all you can eat catfish restaurants located all over the state were raised in Asia.

I'm guessing bomb craters make good catfish ponds in viet nam.

And

Since we have no approved definition of honey, anything goes. if you didn't see it come out of the hive, then chances are its syrup that came from china in 55 gallon drums with a tad of real honey added for flavor by some guy in America - all perfectly legal
I seem to remember the subject being raised in the Food Toxicology course I took at Cal Berkeley back in the 1970's. I dimly recall the country where the wine was found to be adulterated with lead was Italy or Spain. It's highly illegal but that doesn't stop everyone, I suppose.

Personally don't care a whole lot for bee vomit, er, I mean, honey. But it is a remarkable substance. When it's not cut with corn syrup. And the bees themselves are trés interessant.
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Re: The Food Thread

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:51 pm

Since we have no approved definition of honey, anything goes. if you didn't see it come out of the hive, then chances are its syrup that came from china in 55 gallon drums with a tad of real honey added for flavor by some guy in America - all perfectly legal
Not entirely. There is a definition, that specifies "that bees make" is used by the FDA.

"Reference materials in the public domain define honey as “a thick, sweet, syrupy
substance that bees make as food from the nectar of plants or secretions of living parts of
plants and store in honeycombs.”2 FDA has concluded that this definition accurately
reflects the common usage of the term “honey."

For a food consisting of honey and a sweetener, the label must, among other information,
include both of the following:
a. A statement of identity, which must accurately identify or describe the basic
nature of the food or its characterizing properties or ingredients (see section 403(i)
of the FD&C Act, 21 CFR 101.3(b), and 21 CFR 102.5(a)): for example, “Blend
of honey and corn syrup,” if the food has more honey than corn syrup
(conversely, “Blend of corn syrup and honey,” if the food has more corn syrup
than honey).
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations
6
b. The common or usual name of each ingredient in the ingredient statement. In this
case, the ingredient statement would show “honey” and the common or usual
name of the sweetener (e.g., “sugar,” “corn syrup”), in descending order of
predominance by weight (see section 403(i) of the FD&C Act and 21 CFR
101.4(a)(1)).

Problem is, FDA is fairly toothless in enforcement, so yeah, I agree - buy honey from the farm.

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Re: The Food Thread

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Ulysses wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:30 pm
O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:36 pm
I clicked on this only because I didn't know there was any such thing as "leftover wine."
What a bunch of idiots - in all their "cleverness" they didn't even mention "drink it"

https://www.rd.com/advice/saving-money/leftover-wine/
Ooof.

Considering that until relatively recently some unscrupulous purveyors of wine would adulterate their offerings with a lead compound to make it taste sweeter. It was lead acetate, called sugar of lead. Postulated as one of the reasons for the fall of the Roman empire. But apparently still added to some wines in the 20th century. No, I don't have any proof of that, but I'd be wary of slurping up any old wine absent provenance.
I bet a lot of these old wines from the 18th or 19th century that are "found" in old wine cellars or were part of some royal or rich man's stash have this lead additive. Probably a lot of the early 20th century wine as well. I've never been much for wine but have in the past drank white wine from Germany. Never could stand red wine. Also, back in the day arsenic and strychnine were commonly used for idiotic purposes.

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