48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

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48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Mon Mar 14, 2016 12:21 pm

48 years ago today women, children, the elderly, babies and livestock were gunned down in the village of My Lai. exposing this atrocity helped bring an end to the very wrong viet nam war. As many as 500 were murdered. The U.S. government has maintained that atrocities like this were isolated incidents.


until recently when Nick Turse stumbled on files of over 300 similar events that the military was able to keep quiet. His book, Kill Anything That Moves exposes the real viet nam war.

a Chris Hedges review
http://www.truthdig.com/arts_culture/it ... s_20130312

from Moyers another excerpt

http://billmoyers.com/2013/02/08/excerp ... hat-moves/



an excerpt

Americans entering My Lai encountered only civilians: women, children, and old men. Many were still cooking their breakfast rice. Nevertheless, Medina's orders were followed to a T. Soldiers of Charlie Company killed. They killed everything. They killed everything that moved.

Advancing in small squads, the men of the unit shot chickens as they scurried about, pigs as they bolted, and cows and water buff allowing among the thatch- roofed houses. They gunned down old men sitting in their homes and children as they ran for cover. They tossed grenades into homes without even bothering to look inside. An officer grabbed a woman by the hair and shot her point-blank with a pistol. A woman who came out of her home with a baby in her arms was shot down on the spot. As the tiny child hit the ground, another GI opened up on the infant with his M-16 automatic rifle.

Over four hours, members of Charlie Company methodically slaughtered more than five hundred unarmed victims, killing some in ones and twos, others in small groups, and collecting many more in a drainage ditch that would become an infamous killing ground.

They faced no opposition. They even took a quiet break to eat lunch in the midst of the carnage. Along the way, they also raped women and young girls, mutilated the dead, systematically burned homes, and fouled the area's drinking water.

There were scores of witnesses on the ground and still more overhead, American officers and helicopter crewmen perfectly capable of seeing the growing piles of civilian bodies. Yet when the military released the first news of the assault, it was portrayed as a victory over a formidable enemy force, a legitimate battle in which 128 enemy troops were killed without the loss of a single American life. In a routine congratulatory telegram, General William Westmoreland, the commander of U.S. forces in Vietnam, lauded the "heavy blows" inflicted on the enemy. His protégé, the commander of the Americal Division, added a special note praising Charlie Company's "aggressiveness."

Despite communiqués, radio reports, and English- language accounts released by the Viet namese revolutionary forces, the My Lai massacre would remain, to the outside world, an American victory for more than a year. And the truth might have remained hidden forever if not for the perseverance of a single Vietnam veteran named Ron Ridenhour. The twenty- two-year-old Ridenhour had not been among the hundred American troops at My Lai, though he had seen civilians murdered elsewhere in Vietnam; instead, he heard about the slaughter from other soldiers who had been in Pinkville that day. Unnerved, Ridenhour took the unprecedented step of carefully gathering testimony from multiple American eyewitnesses. Then, upon returning to the United States after his yearlong tour of duty, he committed himself to doing what ever was necessary to expose the incident to public scrutiny.

Ridenhour's efforts were helped by the painstaking investigative reporting of Seymour Hersh, who published newspaper articles about the massacre; by the appearance in Life magazine of grisly full-color images that army photographer Ron Haeberle captured in My Lai as the slaughter was unfolding; and by a confessional interview that a soldier from Charlie Company gave to CBS News. The Pentagon, for its part, consistently fought to minimize what had happened, claiming that reports by Vietnamese survivors were wildly exaggerated. At the same time, the military focused its attention on the lowest ranking officer who could conceivably shoulder the blame for such a nightmare: Charlie Company's Lieutenant William Calley.

An army inquiry into the killings eventually determined that thirty individuals were involved in criminal misconduct during the massacre or its cover- up. Twenty- eight of them were officers, including two generals, and the inquiry concluded they had committed a total of 224 serious offenses. But only Calley was ever convicted of any wrongdoing. He was sentenced to life in prison for the premeditated murder of twenty- two civilians, but President Nixon freed him from prison and allowed him to remain under house arrest. He was eventually paroled after serving just forty months, most of it in the comfort of his own quarters.

The public response generally followed the official one. Twenty-five years later, Ridenhour would sum it up this way. At the end of it, if you ask people what happened at My Lai, they would say:

"Oh yeah, isn't that where Lieutenant Calley went crazy and killed all those people?" No, that was not what happened. Lieutenant Calley was one of the people who went crazy and killed a lot of people at My Lai, but this was an operation, not an aberration.

Looking back, it's clear that the real aberration was the unprecedented and unparalleled investigation and exposure of My Lai. No other American atrocity committed during the war — and there were so many — was ever afforded anything approaching the same attention.
Last edited by billy.pilgrim on Wed Mar 16, 2016 7:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Wed Mar 16, 2016 7:42 am

Thanks to Hugh Thompson and his crew for doing the hard thing and standing up to the murderer.

Mr. Thompson was widely vilified for trying to stop the massacre
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Wed Mar 16, 2016 3:44 pm

kinda figured a reply from seth
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by rstrong » Wed Mar 16, 2016 4:00 pm

billy.pilgrim wrote:kinda figured a reply from seth
I'll fill in for him.

Seth Milner: Citation? You made it up!

billy.pilgrim: (Provides link to reporting on the court case from a respected, accredited news service)

Seth Milner: One link? That doesn't prove anything!

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Wed Mar 16, 2016 4:21 pm

rstrong wrote:
billy.pilgrim wrote:kinda figured a reply from seth
I'll fill in for him.

Seth Milner: Citation? You made it up!

billy.pilgrim: (Provides link to reporting on the court case from a respected, accredited news service)

Seth Milner: One link? That doesn't prove anything!
thought maybe he was there, but then that could be why he didn't respond
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:29 am

another anniversary. It has been 49 years yet we persist in starting more and more wars.

http://billmoyers.com/2013/02/08/excerp ... t-moves/7/


from the recently uncovered War Crimes Working Group files more than 300 allegations of massacres, murders, rapes, torture, assaults, mutilations and other atrocities that were substantiated by army investigators. They detailed the deaths of 137 civilians in mass killings, and 78 smaller scale attacks in which Vietnamese civilians were killed, wounded and sexually assaulted. They identified 141 instances in which US troops used fists, sticks, bats, water torture and electrical torture on noncombatants. The files also contained 500 allegations that weren’t proven at the time — like the murders of scores, perhaps hundreds, of Vietnamese civilians by the 101st Airborne Division’s Tiger Force, which would be confirmed and made public only in 2003.
In hundreds of incident summaries and sworn statements in the War Crimes Working Group files, veterans laid bare what had occurred in the backlands of rural Vietnam — the war that Americans back home didn’t see nightly on their televisions or read about over morning coffee. A sergeant told investigators how he had put a bullet, point-blank, into the brain of an unarmed boy after gunning down the youngster’s brother; an army ranger matter-of-factly described slicing the ears off a dead Vietnamese and said that he planned to continue mutilating corpses. Other files documented the killing of farmers in their fields and the rape of a child carried out by an interrogator at an army base. Reading case after case — like the incident in which a lieutenant “captured two unarmed and unidentified Vietnamese males, estimated ages 2-3 and 7-8 years … and killed them for no reason” — I began to get a sense of the ubiquity of atrocity during the American War.


Turse tried to track down and interview many of the people named in the War Crimes files -

“Some of the veterans I tried to contact wanted nothing to do with my questions, almost instantaneously slamming down the phone receiver. But most were willing to speak to me, and many even seemed glad to talk to someone who had a sense of the true nature of the war. In homes from Maryland to California, across kitchen tables and in marathon four-hour telephone calls, scores of former soldiers and marines opened up about their experiences. Some had little remorse; an interrogator who’d tortured prisoners, for instance, told me that his actions were merely standard operating procedure. Another veteran, whispering so that his family wouldn’t overhear, …

… And yet another former GI ruefully recounted how, walking through a Vietnamese village, he had spun around when a local woman chattered angrily at him (probably complaining about the commotion that the troops were causing) and driven the butt of his rifle into her nose. He remembered walking away, laughing, as blood poured from the woman’s face. Decades later, he could no longer imagine how his nineteen-year-old self had done such a thing,”
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by Boatrocker » Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:39 am

Never saw combat, myself; my war was that cold one you may have heard about. But I've heard enough anecdotal testimony/confession over the years- from not only Viet Nam vets, but back to Korea and WWII and up to Desert Storm/Iraqi Freedom/Enduring Freedom- to convince me that it is usual and customary. It's why we like to use kids in our military; they are extra amendable to the sort of manipulation and conditioning that allows almost any human to devolve into a "killer," for lack of a better word, during war.
"On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron." — H. L. Mencken, July 26, 1920, in The Baltimore Evening Sun

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by k9nanny » Tue May 30, 2017 4:18 pm

This seems an appropriate place to share this.
What about all this "Thank you for your service" ? Sometimes I think it's about as meaningful as Have A Nice Day.
I've been in a funk since reading this.

http://newversenews.blogspot.com/2017/0 ... rvice.html

One verse:
My ‘service’ was no service to anyone,
least of all the people for whom
I was supposed to be putting my life
at risk. I served hubris, avarice
and a white nation’s desire to beat
another nation of obdurate brown
people into bloody submission.
Se Non Ora, Quando?

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue May 30, 2017 7:15 pm

k9nanny wrote:
Tue May 30, 2017 4:18 pm
This seems an appropriate place to share this.
What about all this "Thank you for your service" ? Sometimes I think it's about as meaningful as Have A Nice Day.
I've been in a funk since reading this.

http://newversenews.blogspot.com/2017/0 ... rvice.html
:( It reminds me of (also posted by Boatrocker Sep 03, 2013):
On March 22, 1905 Harper's Bazaar rejected Mark Twain's pro-peace short story, 'The War Prayer', as "not quite suited to a woman's magazine". Eight days later, Twain wrote to his friend Dan Beard, to whom he had read the story, "I don't think the prayer will be published in my time. None but the dead are permitted to tell the truth." Unfortunately, Twain had an exclusive contract with Harper & Brothers, so the 1,300-word classic tale remained unpublished until 1923. We reproduce it here:

The War Prayer

It was a time of great and exalting excitement. The country was up in arms, the war was on, in every breast burned the holy fire of patriotism; the drums were beating, the bands playing, the toy pistols popping, the bunched firecrackers hissing and sputtering; on every hand and far down the receding and fading spreads of roofs and balconies a fluttering wilderness of flags flashed in the sun; daily the young volunteers marched down the wide avenue gay and fine in their new uniforms, the proud fathers and mothers and sisters and sweethearts cheering them with voices choked with happy emotion as they swung by; nightly the packed mass meetings listened, panting, to patriot oratory which stirred the deepest deeps of their hearts and which they interrupted at briefest intervals with cyclones of applause, the tears running down their cheeks the while; in the churches the pastors preached devotion to flag and country and invoked the God of Battles, beseeching His aid in our good cause in outpouring of fervid eloquence which moved every listener.

It was indeed a glad and gracious time, and the half dozen rash spirits that ventured to disapprove of the war and cast a doubt upon its righteousness straightway got such a stern and angry warning that for their personal safety's sake they quickly shrank out of sight and offended no more in that way.

Sunday morning came-next day the battalions would leave for the front; the church was filled; the volunteers were there, their faces alight with material dreams-visions of a stern advance, the gathering momentum, the rushing charge, the flashing sabers, the flight of the foe, the tumult, the enveloping smoke, the fierce pursuit, the surrender!-then home from the war, bronzed heros, welcomed, adored, submerged in golden seas of glory! With the volunteers sat their dear ones, proud, happy, and envied by the neighbors and friends who had no sons and brothers to send forth to the field of honor, there to win for the flag or, failing, die the noblest of noble deaths. The service proceeded; a war chapter from the Old Testament was read; the first prayer was said; it was followed by an organ burst that shook the building, and with one impulse the house rose, with glowing eyes and beating hearts, and poured out that tremendous invocation -- "God the all-terrible! Thou who ordainest, Thunder thy clarion and lightning thy sword!"

Then came the "long" prayer. None could remember the like of it for passionate pleading and moving and beautiful language. The burden of its supplication was that an ever--merciful and benignant Father of us all would watch over our noble young soldiers and aid, comfort, and encourage them in their patriotic work; bless them, shield them in His mighty hand, make them strong and confident, invincible in the bloody onset; help them to crush the foe, grant to them and to their flag and country imperishable honor and glory -

An aged stranger entered and moved with slow and noiseless step up the main aisle, his eyes fixed upon the minister, his long body clothed in a robe that reached to his feet, his head bare, his white hair descending in a frothy cataract to his shoulders, his seamy face unnaturally pale, pale even to ghastliness. With all eyes following him and wondering, he made his silent way; without pausing, he ascended to the preacher's side and stood there, waiting.

With shut lids the preacher, unconscious of his presence, continued his moving prayer, and at last finished it with the words, uttered in fervent appeal,"Bless our arms, grant us the victory, O Lord our God, Father and Protector of our land and flag!"

The stranger touched his arm, motioned him to step aside -- which the startled minister did -- and took his place. During some moments he surveyed the spellbound audience with solemn eyes in which burned an uncanny light; then in a deep voice he said

"I come from the Throne-bearing a message from Almighty God!" The words smote the house with a shock; if the stranger perceived it he gave no attention. "He has heard the prayer of His servant your shepherd and grant it if such shall be your desire after I, His messenger, shall have explained to you its import-that is to say, its full import. For it is like unto many of the prayers of men, in that it asks for more than he who utters it is aware of-except he pause and think.

"God's servant and yours has prayed his prayer. Has he paused and taken thought? Is it one prayer? No, it is two- one uttered, the other not. Both have reached the ear of His Who hearth all supplications, the spoken and the unspoken. Ponder this-keep it in mind. If you beseech a blessing upon yourself, beware! lest without intent you invoke a curse upon a neighbor at the same time. If you pray for the blessing of rain upon your crop which needs it, by that act you are possibly praying for a curse upon some neighbor's crop which may not need rain and can be injured by it.

"You have heard your servant's prayer-the uttered part of it. I am commissioned by God to put into words the other part of it-that part which the pastor, and also you in your hearts, fervently prayed silently. And ignorantly and unthinkingly? God grant that it was so! You heard these words: 'Grant us the victory, O Lord our God!' That is sufficient. The whole of the uttered prayer is compact into those pregnant words. Elaborations were not necessary. When you have prayed for victory you have prayed for many unmentioned results which follow victory-must follow it, cannot help but follow it. Upon the listening spirit of God the Father fell also the unspoken part of the prayer. He commandeth me to put it into words. Listen!

"O Lord our Father, our young patriots, idols of our hearts, go forth to battle-be Thou near them! With them, in spirit, we also go forth from the sweet peace of our beloved firesides to smite the foe. O Lord our God, help us to tear their soldiers to bloody shreds with our shells; help us to cover their smiling fields with the pale forms of their patriot dead; help us to drown the thunder of the guns with the shrieks of their wounded, writhing in pain; help us to lay waste their humble homes with a hurricane of fire; help us to wring the hearts of their unoffending widows with unavailing grief; help us to turn them out roofless with their little children to wander unfriended the wastes of their desolated land in rags and hunger and thirst, sports of the sun flames of summer and the icy winds of winter, broken in spirit, worn with travail, imploring Thee for the refuge of the grave and denied it-for our sakes who adore Thee, Lord, blast their hopes, blight their lives, protract their bitter pilgrimage, make heavy their steps, water their way with their tears, stain the white snow with the blood of their wounded feet! We ask it, in the spirit of love, of Him Who is the Source of Love, and Who is ever-faithful refuge and friend of all that are sore beset and seek His aid with humble and contrite hearts. Amen.

(After a pause)

"Ye have prayed it; if ye still desire it, speak! The messenger of the Most High waits."

It was believed afterward that the man was a lunatic, because there was no sense in what he said.
He also wrote:

Mark Twain's "Other" Battle Hymn of the Republic
Mark Twain, "Incident in the Philippines" (1924)
Comments on the Moro Massacre
by Mark Twain (March 12, 1906)
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by bannination » Tue May 30, 2017 8:37 pm

Boatrocker wrote:
Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:39 am
Never saw combat, myself; my war was that cold one you may have heard about. But I've heard enough anecdotal testimony/confession over the years- from not only Viet Nam vets, but back to Korea and WWII and up to Desert Storm/Iraqi Freedom/Enduring Freedom- to convince me that it is usual and customary. It's why we like to use kids in our military; they are extra amendable to the sort of manipulation and conditioning that allows almost any human to devolve into a "killer," for lack of a better word, during war.
Not only kids, but those that usually don't have any better options, they're desperate to get out of whatever situation they're in.

I do have great respect and sorrow for anyone that serves, it's just, they're not usually fighting to protect us, they're fighting for the rich to get richer with few exceptions.

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by homerfobe » Tue May 30, 2017 9:48 pm

bannination wrote:I do have great respect and sorrow for anyone that serves, it's just, they're not usually fighting to protect us, they're fighting for the rich to get richer with few exceptions.
I was going to say something about Whitmire's panty-waist article; but since the loss of over three thousand lives in the WTC attack means nothing to pansies who can't see beyond their own stupidity, I won't. Mankind has been fighting one another ever since he took to walking on his hind legs, and war isn't pretty. If the US wasn't the aggressor, someone else would be, if the US retaliates against an ideology or physical enemy, the snowflakes begin to melt and whine back and forth. It's life people, always has been and always will be, sad though it is.
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by homerfobe » Thu Jun 01, 2017 2:22 pm

k9nanny wrote: This seems an appropriate place to share this.
What about all this "Thank you for your service" ? Sometimes I think it's about as meaningful as Have A Nice Day.
That and "I'll pray for you".
Did ya'll hear that my Aunt Maude died? No, I didn't! I'll pray for you! I fell and broke my foot. Really? I'll pray for you!
Pray for what? That Aunt Maude won't be dead in the morning? That my foot won't be broke in the morning? I'll pray for you is about as meaningful as Have A Nice Day too.
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by Boatrocker » Sun Jun 25, 2017 11:45 am

Seems a good thread to point out some History . . .
141 years ago today- on another Sunday, the 25th of June, 1876- a large number of warriors of the Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho nations forced a re-write of the US Army's doctrine on the American High Plains, in regard to the "Indian Problem." App. 268 men, including all 208 in the battalion led by Lt. Col, George A. Custer himself, died for their country and it's policy of genocide of Native Americans who refused to cooperate (and some who did cooperate.)
"On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron." — H. L. Mencken, July 26, 1920, in The Baltimore Evening Sun

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Mon Jun 26, 2017 9:39 am

Boatrocker wrote:
Sun Jun 25, 2017 11:45 am
Seems a good thread to point out some History . . .
141 years ago today- on another Sunday, the 25th of June, 1876- a large number of warriors of the Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho nations forced a re-write of the US Army's doctrine on the American High Plains, in regard to the "Indian Problem." App. 268 men, including all 208 in the battalion led by Lt. Col, George A. Custer himself, died for their country and it's policy of genocide of Native Americans who refused to cooperate (and some who did cooperate.)
Years ago we took a back road trip from Florida to western Montana - no interstates and as many dirt and gravel roads as possible. We took turns reading Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. My 12 year old son was visibly moved at the Little Bighorn site - likely soon to be sold to koch bro assholes by the big cheeto
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by Boatrocker » Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:00 pm

Having read so much about it and him (Cavalier In Buckskin by Robert Utley was a pretty good warts-and-all bio on Custer; Evan S. Connell's Son of The Morningstar was more a Custer blowjob), the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is on my bucket list.
"On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron." — H. L. Mencken, July 26, 1920, in The Baltimore Evening Sun

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by JTA » Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:56 pm

billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Jun 26, 2017 9:39 am
Boatrocker wrote:
Sun Jun 25, 2017 11:45 am
Seems a good thread to point out some History . . .
141 years ago today- on another Sunday, the 25th of June, 1876- a large number of warriors of the Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho nations forced a re-write of the US Army's doctrine on the American High Plains, in regard to the "Indian Problem." App. 268 men, including all 208 in the battalion led by Lt. Col, George A. Custer himself, died for their country and it's policy of genocide of Native Americans who refused to cooperate (and some who did cooperate.)
Years ago we took a back road trip from Florida to western Montana - no interstates and as many dirt and gravel roads as possible. We took turns reading Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. My 12 year old son was visibly moved at the Little Bighorn site - likely soon to be sold to koch bro assholes by the big cheeto
That sounds bad ass. How long did the drive take you?
You aren't doing it wrong if no one knows what you are doing.

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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Mon Jun 26, 2017 5:00 pm

JTA wrote:
Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:56 pm
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Jun 26, 2017 9:39 am
Boatrocker wrote:
Sun Jun 25, 2017 11:45 am
Seems a good thread to point out some History . . .
141 years ago today- on another Sunday, the 25th of June, 1876- a large number of warriors of the Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho nations forced a re-write of the US Army's doctrine on the American High Plains, in regard to the "Indian Problem." App. 268 men, including all 208 in the battalion led by Lt. Col, George A. Custer himself, died for their country and it's policy of genocide of Native Americans who refused to cooperate (and some who did cooperate.)
Years ago we took a back road trip from Florida to western Montana - no interstates and as many dirt and gravel roads as possible. We took turns reading Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. My 12 year old son was visibly moved at the Little Bighorn site - likely soon to be sold to koch bro assholes by the big cheeto
That sounds bad ass. How long did the drive take you?

10 days - navarre to Victor Montana

It was fun, running into dead ends before GPS and google maps, coaxing the fuel through the Badlands before running out and coasting up in front of a guy working on his truck in Buffalo Gap, finding the little creek where Sitting Bull may be buried. Teaching my son to believe me and always look for local and never eat anywhere that you can go to at home was something else I'm proud to have taught him on that trip.

I should find and share some of my pictures.


Oh yeah, when you think you are so damn lucky to follow a snowplow up a mountain, remember that county lines often follow things like rivers and mountain ridges. Snow plows turn around at county lines.
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Sat Sep 23, 2017 9:10 am

I'm only half way through the second episode, but so far I'm mostly seeing a slightly sharper version of the same old bullshit.

https://www.truthdig.com/articles/killing-american-way/


"The revisionism never stops, and the blood never dries. The invader is pitied and purged of guilt, while “searching for some meaning in this terrible tragedy.” Cue Bob Dylan: “Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?”



"The “meaning” of the Vietnam war is no different from the meaning of the genocidal campaign against the Native Americans, the colonial massacres in the Philippines, the atomic bombings of Japan, the leveling of every city in North Korea. The aim was described by Colonel Edward Lansdale, the famous CIA man on whom Graham Greene based his central character in “The Quiet American.”

Quoting Robert Taber’s “The War of the Flea,” Lansdale said, “There is only one means of defeating an insurgent people who will not surrender, and that is extermination. There is only one way to control a territory that harbors resistance, and that is to turn it into a desert.”

Nothing has changed."
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Vrede too
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by Vrede too » Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:52 am

The Myth of the Spitting Antiwar Protester

Wussy hawks that were so very wrong had to create a boogeyman other than themselves.
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

billy.pilgrim
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Re: 48 yrs ago - destroy everything in the village that was "walking, crawling or growing

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:08 am

Vrede too wrote:
Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:52 am
The Myth of the Spitting Antiwar Protester

Wussy hawks that were so very wrong had to create a boogeyman other than themselves.

isn't that so of most republican stories?

they can't go with the truth without proving themselves wrong

the only vets who were spit on were the vets against the war who were spit on by construction workers - it was all over the news in 1967. too bad there were no news stories with pictures showing vets being spit on or otherwise
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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