Failed prohibition

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:25 pm

"sweep it under the rug and hope it go [sic] away," is yet another desperate lie by a floundering drug war addict. This topic began with explicit discussion of how replacing the LEO approach with a public health one has REDUCED deaths here and abroad and how it could do even more so here.
One could try to argue that the evidence and science presented is faulty by presenting alternative evidence and science, not that LL ever will, but for him to say that we or the experts are advocating apathy and wishful thinking is blatant, disgusting dishonesty. Clearly, LL doesn't have the stones to face that it's HIS career that was dedicated to not caring a whit about saving lives.

More info:

Harm Reduction
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Leo Lyons
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:41 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:25 pm
"sweep it under the rug and hope it go [sic] away," is yet another desperate lie by a floundering drug war addict.
A lie? You silly doofwiffle, that was a speculation, not a statement. You're so caught up in yourself, that in your rush to trash someone, you can't tell the difference anymore! What a floundering, narcissistic, idiot you are.

This topic began with explicit discussion of how replacing the LEO approach with a public health one has REDUCED deaths here and abroad and how it could do even more so here.
Who pays for it?

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O Really
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by O Really » Mon Oct 15, 2018 3:58 pm

Leo Lyons wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:41 pm

This topic began with explicit discussion of how replacing the LEO approach with a public health one has REDUCED deaths here and abroad and how it could do even more so here.
Who pays for it?
[/quote]

I think that would be the same people that are paying for the mess we have now.

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Mon Oct 15, 2018 4:05 pm

:roll:
Vrede too wrote:
Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:07 pm
An enthusiastic participant in and financial beneficiary of the utterly failed, decades-long drug prohibition asking, “who pays for this?” is a scream....
Vrede too wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:16 pm
New FBI Report: Every 20 seconds, someone is arrested for a drug law violation in the U.S.

... In 2001, Portugal enacted one of the most extensive drug law reforms in the world when it decriminalized low-level possession and use of all illegal drugs. Today in Portugal, no one is arrested or incarcerated for drug possession, many more people are receiving treatment, and addiction, HIV/AIDS and drug overdose deaths have drastically decreased....
Providing a Safe Space to Use Drugs Can Help End the Overdose Crisis

... They are safe, monitored facilities where participants are also offered health care, counseling, and referrals to health and social services, including drug treatment. Not a single overdose fatality has occurred at any operating SCS and the research shows they also reduce overall overdose mortality rates. Having supervision also means that an overdose resulting from unknowingly consuming fentanyl—where death can occur in a matter of minutes and long-before emergency help can arrive—can be reversed immediately on site....

The evidence is abundantly clear. Nearly four decades of scientific research across three continents has confirmed that SCS prevent fatal overdose, increase the number of people entering treatment, reduce the risk of infectious disease, minimize neighborhood disorder like public injecting or improperly discarded syringes, and save public resources – all without any increase in drug use or drug-related crime.

The federal government’s threat to thwart these efforts is as old as the drug war itself. Identical threats were used to try to stifle sterile syringe programs and access to medical marijuana – policies that now have widespread support and an abundance of evidence of their effectiveness. Hindsight has proved that the federal government was on the wrong side of both history and science, but we are still paying for their attempted blockages and delays.

HIV and Hepatitis C incidences are surging as a result of increased injection drug use in jurisdictions like Indiana and Kentucky that took their cue from the federal government and refused to offer sterile syringes. Research shows that annual opioid overdose mortality rates are 25% higher in states that do not have access to medical marijuana. Earlier embrace of these critical interventions would have dramatically altered the course of this overdose crisis and saved countless lives.

... By opposing SCS, the DOJ is back on the hamster wheel. But we cannot afford to continue going around and around—not while we have nearly 200 people a day dying wholly preventable deaths. Cities and states must “just say no” to federal attempts to block this critical live-saving intervention.

The overdose crisis did not have to happen—the focus on enforcement and incarceration meant that we did not have the public health infrastructure in place to adequately address increasing rates of drug use and keep people safe. The current crisis is a political one. When we let the DOJ’s ideology trump evidence, and prioritize punishment over preserving life, the result is thousands of preventable deaths. It is time to get off the hamster wheel.
Huge savings, not costs. When you repeatedly cower from the science, evidence and arguments that have already been presented, you repeatedly make a fool of yourself.

Of course, you are free to donate towards addiction prevention and treatment, given that you were and are being paid for making society worse off.
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Leo Lyons
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Tue Oct 16, 2018 9:43 am

Vrede too wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 4:05 pm
:roll:
Vrede too wrote:
Sat Oct 13, 2018 2:07 pm
An enthusiastic participant in and financial beneficiary of the utterly failed, decades-long drug prohibition asking, “who pays for this?” is a scream .... Of course, you are free to donate towards addiction prevention and treatment, given that you were and are being paid for making society worse off.
Your envious pissing and jealousy (again and again) over my personal wealth is a scream! (Oh, did I mention my "generous" pension paid for by your tax dollars?) Feel free to disclose how much YOU have donated towards addiction prevention and treatment. Don't include your personal treatments. I'm guessing your jealousy stems from the fact that I have a comfortable pension; as opposed to your pissing your retirement opportunities away by flitting all over the country "making a fool of yourself" protesting. (I'm certain you're saying "at least I had fun". :roll: )
Vrede too wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:16 pm
New FBI Report: Every 20 seconds, someone is arrested for a drug law violation in the U.S.
Dang! That's got to be a new record!
:bs: Here's the real scream: Your "science, evidence and arguments" links you've posted above---from a :bs: drug advocacy site. Too eff'n funny! :lol:

billy.pilgrim
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:20 pm

https://www.splcenter.org/20181018/alab ... -marijuana

and all this expense and personal damage from one of our least populated states
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Fri Oct 19, 2018 6:32 am

It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:50 pm

These 5 states (plus 2) will have weed-related ballot initiatives on Tuesday

Voters who show up to the polls in Michigan and North Dakota on November 6 decide whether to green-light recreational use. If approved, the states will join nine others, plus Washington D.C., where recreational use is already legal — Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Colorado, Alaska, Vermont, Maine and Massachusetts.

Less aggressive cannabis-related measures are at stake in Missouri, Utah and Ohio. And races in Florida and Kentucky, viewed by some as referendums on pot, could tip the likelihood of expanded legalization....
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Wed Nov 07, 2018 12:25 pm

https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/07/health/h ... index.html
Marijuana

Adult recreational users of weed will be able to use it legally in another state.

According to preliminary results, more than 54% of voters in Michigan said yes to the initiative that imposes a 10-ounce limit for Michigan residents, creates a state licensing system, will allow for retail sales subject to a 10% tax and changes several current weed-related violations to civil infractions.

That makes 10 states -- Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington -- plus the District of Columbia that allow for recreational use.

In North Dakota, voters rejected an initiative that would have allowed for recreational use for adults over 21.
Other states' weed-related initiatives focused on medical marijuana; prior to the election, 31 states and the District of Columbia had laws that legalize or decriminalize it.

Missouri had three medical marijuana initiatives on the ballot this year. Voters said yes to Amendment 2. It legalizes medical marijuana, taxes it at 4% and guarantees that the money will be spent on health care services for veterans. The others, Amendment 3 and Proposition C, that would also have legalized medical use, but would have spent the tax revenue differently, failed.

In Utah, voters said yes to Proposition 2, which means individuals with qualifying illnesses will get access to medical marijuana.
3 for 4, not sure about other measures.
Subject: Election victories for marijuana legalization & drug policy reform

Image

The election results are in and I’m thrilled to let you know that there were several significant victories for our movement. These wins will accelerate efforts to legalize marijuana and to end the broader war on drugs in states across the U.S., at the federal level, and internationally.

Michigan voters approved Proposal 1, a ballot initiative to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana for adults 21 and over, making it the 10th U.S. state to legalize marijuana – and the first in the Midwest. And passage of Amendment 2 in Missouri and Proposition 2 in Utah make them the 32nd and 33rd states to approve medical marijuana.

Florida voters approved Amendment 4, a groundbreaking initiative to restore voting rights to 1.4 million people with drug and other felony convictions upon completion of their sentences.

Embracing drug policy reform proved to be a winning strategy for gubernatorial candidates, as Gavin Newsom (CA), Jared Polis (CO), J.B. Pritzer (IL), and Michelle Lujan Grisham (NM) emerged victorious.

Drug policy reform also played a major role in scores of local, state and federal races all over the country. The most powerful marijuana reform opponent in the House of Representatives, Pete Sessions of Texas, lost to Colin Allred, a supporter of marijuana reform. Sessions has single-handedly blocked Congress from holding any votes on marijuana reform for more than a year. With Sessions out, we now have an opportunity to move our issues forward in Congress.

We are grateful for voters like you for making these incredible victories possible.

Western and northeastern states have led the way on legalizing marijuana, but the victory in Michigan powerfully demonstrates the national reach of our movement. The Drug Policy Alliance and its lobbying arm, Drug Policy Action, helped fund and played a significant role in drafting Proposal 1 in Michigan and played a leading role in drafting and funding Amendment 2 in Missouri.

Supporters like you know the drug war has failed, and it’s encouraging to see more and more voters and candidates across the country raising their voices to reform our broken drug laws.

Our movement to end the drug war took a significant leap forward in this election....

Thanks again for making these crucial wins possible, and please continue standing with us for drug policies grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights.

Sincerely,
Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno
Executive Director
Drug Policy Alliance
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

billy.pilgrim
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Wed Dec 12, 2018 4:56 pm

hard not to see that some drugs can kill people and others do all manner of wonders, but on this list-o-killer-drugs I can't see anything close to the mellow weed that fuels our private prisons and pays cops salaries out of taxpayer's pockets - all to support invented reasons for laws that have destroyed millions of futures.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health ... li=BBnb7Kz

I see Xanax and fentanyl and cocaine and heroin and even valium, but the evil killer weed missed the cut
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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neoplacebo
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by neoplacebo » Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:08 pm

On the rare occasions that I answer the phone when it shows a number I don't recognize, I will pick up and just say something like "you wanna buy some heroin?" or just scream into the phone "WHAT IS IT?". I've also been in a running war with that fucking addiction network since they had an ad a couple of years ago saying some such shit like "23 million people a year die from drug abuse." Well, once I saw that I immediately called their number since it occurred to me that if 23 million people a year have died since the war on drugs started back in the mid 70's there wouldn't be anybody left on the fucking continent. Well, needless to say, after I called, they kept calling me back (the whole thing is a goddamn insurance scam anyway) and the first time they called I just asked them where they got their 23 million a year figure from but they couldn't tell me. They kept calling my number for several months and I would always thank them for calling but tell them that I have decided to continue to abuse drugs and enjoy life to the fullest. They generally don't know what to say. I'm not like the others.

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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Mon Dec 24, 2018 5:19 pm

Damn leo, looks like the cops and bs race laws are wrong again.

Forbes: Marijuana Legalization Means Safer Borders And Less Smuggling, Study Shows.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/ ... udy-shows/
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Mon Dec 24, 2018 8:18 pm

billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Dec 24, 2018 5:19 pm
Damn leo, looks like the cops and bs race laws are wrong again.

Forbes: Marijuana Legalization Means Safer Borders And Less Smuggling, Study Shows.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/ ... udy-shows/
He claims to have not enforced pot laws, though how that's even possible for a narc escapes me. Anyhow, logic dictates that the same would be true for any illegal drug that's smuggled in.
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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Leo Lyons
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:13 am

Image

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Leo Lyons
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:26 pm

This is so sad. Just think, if drugs were legal, or controlled, this shit wouldn't happen.

6-year-old girl rescued after posting photos of dead father on Facebook

A young girl shared images of her dead father online after witnessing a pit bull tearing at his face.

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O Really
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by O Really » Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:07 pm

Dang, you're right, Leo - I don't recall ever hearing about a pit bull chewing on anybody unless they or the dog was on drugs.
Happy New Year, you old reprobate.

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neoplacebo
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by neoplacebo » Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:49 pm

Hell, I wouldn't chew on anybody's face even if I were in the desperate depths of an ether binge, and chewing on something would certainly alleviate the profuse salivating common with ether madness.

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Leo Lyons
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:55 pm

O Really wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:07 pm
Dang, you're right, Leo - I don't recall ever hearing about a pit bull chewing on anybody unless they or the dog was on drugs.
It appears the pit was influenced by the taste of drugs; I wouldn't know for sure though.
Ask Vrede, he's the drug expert.


Happy New Year, you old reprobate.
Same back to you and your family! :wave: :thumbup:

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Leo Lyons
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:58 pm

neoplacebo wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:49 pm
Hell, I wouldn't chew on anybody's face even if I were in the desperate depths of an ether binge, and chewing on something would certainly alleviate the profuse salivating common with ether madness.
I'm assuming the smell of ripening meat was overwhelming to the dog.
Since you said that, do you remember some time back about the stories of drug-crazed weirdo's chewing on people's faces? Hell, the victims were alive!

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Vrede too
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Re: Failed prohibition

Unread post by Vrede too » Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:32 pm

Let me guess from the responses - Leo Lyons is again whining about some negative effects of drugs that we're ALL aware of, while being too cowardly to admit that his failed prohibition did NOTHING to stop those negative effects from being manifested and only ADDED to the societal problems.
It really is time to stop being nice about stupidity.

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