The Worker Thread

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Whack9
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Whack9 » Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:15 pm

O Really wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:48 pm
A bar? That's a new one for me. Can't say they're not trying to make their own shopping experience "a pleasure."
Yeah man they even have a starbucks inside. Not that I'm a huge Starbucks fan but coffee is coffee ...

Right now there's only one HT in G'ville, used to be within walking distance of where I lived. They've got a new one going up too close to my current home. Can't wait.

I must say, Ingles deserves at least a shout out. They've upped their sub game. Not quite Publix but still good.

Last time I was in there they even had an impressive selection of olives. I was very pleased and it really warmed my heart and lifted my spirits from the pits of every day drudgery.

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:32 pm

O Really wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:36 pm
I'm not trying to criticize the organization nor its goals. So how many grocery chains have started stringent policing of their vendor chain?
The US part of the project is barely a year old, and this is the first I've heard of it despite being on the Oxfam mailing list. Maybe there's discussion of progress so far on the website, idk. We do know that the model works, for example going after US retailers in order to improve "independent" sweat shop conditions in the developing world.
Speaking of Rudy, WTF?

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Wed Jul 10, 2019 4:10 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:46 pm
O Really wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:21 pm
Yeah, yeah, but there is more to the issue than is usually mentioned. F'rinstance, the women get paid if they play or if they're on the bench. Men only get paid if they play. Women get a guaranteed base of $100K, plus whatever bonuses they earn. Men get only bonuses, no base. But still...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics ... ost&wpmm=1
My guess is that the USWNT and their allies would accept relative pay equity that took all compensation scheme differences into account. We're so very far from equality that we don't have to take these demands literally, anyhow. They're just pushing a debate that will take decades to resolve. I'm not sure what the gap is here in the US, but the FIFA WC prizes gap is slated to WIDEN to $440M vs $60M.

US viewers watched women’s World Cup final in record numbers
Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?

... While the pay disparity from the USSF is significant, there's an even bigger chasm when it comes to bonuses for performance in the World Cup, which are doled out by soccer's international governing body FIFA. The U.S. women were awarded a $4 million bonus for winning this year's tournament. France was given $38 million for winning the men's competition last year.

Why there's debate: The pay gap between the teams has raised allegations of sexism, especially given how much more successful the women have been on the field. This was their fourth World Cup win. The men have never advanced past the quarterfinals and failed to even qualify for the 2018 tournament. There is also evidence that the women generate as much or more revenue for the USSF than the men do....

What's next: The women's game is growing in popularity — the total global audience for the World Cup topped 1 billion — giving the players more leverage to demand pay equity. In response, FIFA's president has proposed doubling the prize money for the Women's World Cup and expanding the tournament to 32 teams. Mediation to settle the U.S. women's lawsuit against the USSF is expected to start sometime soon now that the World Cup is over. Meanwhile, a bill was introduced in the Senate that would halt funding for the 2026 men's World Cup, which the U.S. will co-host with Canada and Mexico, until the women are awarded equal pay....
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by O Really » Wed Jul 10, 2019 7:02 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:32 pm
We do know that the model works, for example going after US retailers in order to improve "independent" sweat shop conditions in the developing world.
Well sure, you can shame some stores into not selling sweatshop sweatshirts, and you can shame a Kardashian into not using sweatshirt labor, but it would seem groceries would be somewhat more difficult for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is the number of different sources from all over. Anyway, good luck to them in their effort.

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by 1 CAT FAN » Fri Jul 12, 2019 2:02 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:03 pm
Trump vs. Obama on jobs

Is President Trump outperforming his predecessor when it comes to job creation? He certainly thinks so. “JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!” he tweeted after the latest monthly numbers showed employers created 224,000 new jobs in June.

But job growth has actually slowed under Trump....

Image
The article neglects to mention that Obama got his results while reducing the deficit 5 years out of 8 and keeping it essentially stable one other year. In contrast, POSPOTUS' results have been financed with a massive deficit increase.
Another Trump Presidential term for a even better picture.
"Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Fri Jul 12, 2019 4:03 pm

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It’s been 12 years since Congress raised the minimum wage―the longest stretch in history.

This is a shameful benchmark, reducing the living standards of working families in this country and exacerbating poverty and inequality. But now, we have a chance to turn that around.

The Raise the Wage Act is expected to receive a vote in the U.S. House next week. And with 205 cosponsors, we need just 14 more supporters to pass a $15 minimum wage and raise the wages of tens of millions of U.S. workers.

Click here to see if your Representative is a cosponsor of the Raise the Wage Act, then make a call today urging Congress to pass a $15 minimum wage by 2024.

This week, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a report assessing the economic impact of a $15 minimum wage. They found that 1.3 million people would be lifted out of poverty and that some 27.3 million low-wage workers would see annual earnings increase by $44 billion―an average $1,500 increase for affected low-wage workers.

Over the last decade, a $7.25 minimum wage has lost purchasing power to the tune of 17 percent, which translates to a loss of more than $3,000 in annual earnings for a full-time, year-round minimum wage worker.

Working people need a raise and that starts by raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Click here to see if your Representative is a cosponsor if this critical legislation, and then make a call today to help pass a $15 minimum wage through the U.S. House.

Thank you for all that you do to raise the wages of all working people.

In solidarity,

Heidi Shierholz
Senior Economist and Director of Policy, EPI Policy Center
https://www.epi.org/
Note: I don't know what the asterisk next to most Rep. co-sponsor names indicates. I've asked, but may not hear back until Mon, if then. No matter for me, Meadows (R-NC11) is not on the list, as expected. :roll:
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by 1 CAT FAN » Sat Jul 13, 2019 2:20 pm

In late 1945, along the banks of the Techa River in the Soviet Union, a dozen labor camps sent 70,000 inmates to begin construction of a secret city. Mere months earlier the United States’ Little Boy and Fat Man bombs had flattened Hiroshima and Nagasaki, leaving Soviet leaders salivating over the massive power of the atom. In a rush to close the gap in weapons technology, the USSR commissioned a sprawling plutonium-production complex in the southern Ural mountains. The clandestine military-industrial community was to be operated by Russia’s Mayak Chemical Combine, and it would come to be known as Chelyabinsk-40.

Within a few years the newfangled nuclear reactors were pumping out plutonium to fuel the Soviet Union’s first atomic weapons. Chelyabinsk-40 was absent from all official maps, and it would be over forty years before the Soviet government would even acknowledge its existence. Nevertheless, the small city became an insidious influence in the Soviet Union, ultimately creating a corona of nuclear contamination dwarfing the devastation of the Chernobyl disaster.

By June 1948, after 31 months of brisk construction, the first of the Chelyabinsk-40 “breeder” reactors was brought online. Soon bricks of common uranium-238 were being bombarded with neutrons, resulting in loaves of pipin’-hot weapons-grade plutonium. In their haste to begin production, Soviet engineers lacked the time to establish proper waste-handling procedures, so most of the byproducts were dealt with by diluting them in water and squirting the effluent into the Techa River. The watered-down waste was a cocktail of “hot” elements, including long-lived fission products such as Strontium-90 and Cesium-137–each with a half-life of approximately thirty years.

In 1951, after about three years of operations at Chelyabinsk-40, Soviet scientists conducted a survey of the Techa River to determine whether radioactive contamination was becoming a problem. In the village of Metlino, just over four miles downriver from the plutonium plant, investigators and Geiger counters clicked nervously along the river bank. Rather than the typical “background” gamma radiation of about 0.21 Röntgens per year, the edge of the Techa River was emanating 5 Röntgens per hour. The village of Metlino on the Techa RiverSuch elevated levels were rather distressing since that the river was the primary source of water for the 1,200 residents there. Subsequent measurements found extensive contamination in 38 other villages along the Techa, seriously jeopardizing the health of about 28,000 people. In addition, almost 100,000 other residents were being exposed to elevated-but-not-quite-as-deadly doses of gamma radiation, both from the river itself and from the floodplain where crops and livestock were raised.

In an effort to avoid serious radiological health effects among the populace, the Soviet government relocated about 7,500 villagers from the most heavily contaminated areas, fenced off the floodplain, and dug wells to provide an alternate water source for the remaining villages. Engineers were brought in to erect earthen dams along the Techa River to prevent radioactive sediments from migrating further downstream. The Soviet scientists at Chelyabinsk-40 also revised their waste disposal strategy, halting the practice of dumping effluent directly into the river. Instead, they constructed a set of “intermediate storage tanks” where waste water could spend some time bleeding off radioactivity. After lingering in these vats for a few months, the diluted dregs were periodically piped to the new long-term storage location: a ten-foot-deep, 110 acre lake called Karachay. For a while these measures spared the Techa River residents from further increases in exposure, but the Mayak Chemical Combine had only begun to demonstrate its flair for misfortune.

By the mid 1950s the workers at the plutonium production plant began to complain of soreness, low blood pressure, loss of coordination, and tremors–the classic symptoms of chronic radiation syndrome. The facility itself was also beginning to encounter chronic complications, particularly in the new intermediate storage system. The row of waste vats sat in a concrete canal a few kilometers outside the main complex, submerged in a constant flow of water to carry away the heat generated by radioactive decay. Soon the technicians discovered that the hot isotopes in the waste water tended to cause a bit of evaporation inside the tanks, resulting in more buoyancy than had been anticipated. This upward pressure put stress on the inlet pipes, eventually compromising the seals and allowing raw radioactive waste to seep into the canal’s coolant water. To make matters worse, several of the tanks’ heat exchangers failed, crippling their cooling capacity.
The workers were aware of these faults, but the ambient radiation in the cooling trench forestalled any repairs. A flurry of calculations indicated that most of the waste water in the tanks would remain in a stable liquid state even without the additional cooling, so technicians continued to operate the plutonium plant in spite of these problems. Their evaporation calculations were in error, however, and the water inside the defective tanks gradually boiled away. A radioactive sludge of nitrates and acetates was left behind, a chemical compound roughly equivalent to TNT.

Unable to shed much heat, the concentrated radioactive slurry continued to increase in temperature within the defective 80,000 gallon containers. On 29 September 1957, one tank reached an estimated 660 degrees Fahrenheit. At 4:20pm local time, the explosive salt deposits in the bottom of the vat detonated. The blast ignited the contents of the other dried-out tanks, producing a combined explosive force equivalent to about 85 tons of TNT. The thick concrete lid which covered the cooling trench was hurled eighty feet away, and seventy tons of highly radioactive fission products were ejected into the open atmosphere. The buildings at Chelyabinsk-40 shuddered as they were buffeted by the shock wave.

While investigators probed the blast site in protective suits, a mile-high column of radionuclides dragged across the landscape. The gamma-emitting dust cloud spread hazardous isotopes of cesium and strontium over 9,000 square miles, affecting some 270,000 Soviet citizens and their food supplies. Over twenty megacuries (MCi) of radioactivity were released, almost half of that expelled by the Chernobyl incident.

In the days that followed, strange reports began to emerge from downwind villages. According to author Richard Pollock in a 1978 Critical Mass Journal article, residents of the Chelyabinsk Province became “hysterical with fear with the incidence of unknown ‘mysterious’ diseases breaking out. Victims were seen with skin ‘sloughing off’ their faces, hands and other exposed parts of their bodies.” After the customary ten-day period of hand-sitting, the government ordered the evacuation of many villages where skin-sloughers and blood-vomiters had appeared. This mass migration left the landscape littered with radioactive ghost towns.

The facilities at Chelyabinsk-40 were swiftly decontaminated with hoses, mops, and squeegees, and soon plutonium production was underway again. The intermediate storage system had been partially compromised by the accident, but the factory was still able to squirt its constant flow of radioactive effluence into Lake Karachay. The lake lacked any surface outlets, so optimistic engineers reasoned that anything dumped into the lake would remain entombed there indefinitely. Many locals were hospitalized with radiation poisoning in the weeks after the waste-tank blast, but the Soviet state forbade doctors from disclosing the true nature of the illnesses. Instead, physicians were instructed to diagnose sufferers with ambiguous “blood problems” and “vegetative syndromes.” The Russian government likewise withheld the colossal calamity from the international community. Within two years, the radiation killed all of the pine trees within a twelve mile radius of Chelyabinsk-40. Highway signs were erected at the edges of the contaminated zone, imploring travelers to roll up their windows while traversing the deteriorated swath of Earth, and to not stop for any reason.
Ten years later, in 1967, a severe drought struck the Chelyabinsk Province. Much to the Russian scientists’ alarm, shallow Lake Karachay gradually began to shrink from its shores. Over several months the water dwindled considerably, leaving the lake about half-empty (or half-full, if you’re more upbeat). This exposed the radioactive sediment in the lake basin, and fifteen years’ worth of radionuclides took to the breeze. About 900 square miles of land was peppered with Strontium-90, Cesium-137, and other unhealthy elements. Almost half a million residents were in the path of this latest dust cloud of doom, many of them the same people who had been affected by the 1957 waste-tank explosion.

Soviet engineers hastily enacted a program to help prevent further sediment from leaving Lake Karachay. For a dozen or so years they dumped rocks, soil, and large concrete blocks into the tainted basin. The Mayak Chemical Combine conceded that the lake was an inadequate long-term storage system, and ordered that Karachay be slowly sealed in a shell of earth and concrete. In 1990, as the Soviet Union teetered at the brink of collapse, government officials finally acknowledged the existence of the secret city of Chelyabinsk-40 (soon renamed to Chelyabinsk-65, then later changed to Ozersk). They also acknowledged its tragic parade of radiological disasters. At that time Lake Karachay remained as the principal waste-dumping site for for the plutonium plant, but the effort to fill the lake with soil and concrete had halved its surface area.

Thirty-nine years of effluent had saturated the lake with nasty isotopes, including an estimated 120 megacuries of long-lived radiation. In contrast, the Chernobyl incident released roughly 100 megacuries of radiation into the environment, but only about 3 megacuries of Strontium-90 and Cesium-137. A delegation who visited Lake Karachay in 1990 measured the radiation at the point where the effluent entered the water, and the needles of their Geiger counters danced at about 600 Röntgens per hour–enough to provide a lethal dose in one hour. They did not linger long.

A report compiled in 1991 found that the incidence of leukemia in the region had increased by 41% since Chelyabinsk-40 opened for business, and that during the 1980s cancers had increased by 21% and circulatory disorders rose by 31%. It is probable, however, that the true numbers are much higher since doctors were required to limit the number diagnoses issued for cancer and other radiation-related illnesses. In the village of Muslyumovo, a local physician’s personal records from 1993 indicated an average male lifespan of 45 years compared to 69 in the rest of the country. Birth defects, sterility, and chronic disease also increased dramatically. In all, over a million Russian citizens were directly affected by the misadventures of the Mayak Chemical Combine from 1948 to 1990, including around 28,000 people classified as “seriously irradiated.”

Today, there are huge tracts of Chelyabinsk land still uninhabitable due to the radionuclides from the river contamination, the 1957 blast, and the 1967 drought. The surface of Lake Karachay is now made up of more concrete than water, however the lake’s payload of fission products is not completely captive. Recent surveys have detected gamma-emitting elements in nearby rivers, indicating that undesirable isotopes have been seeping into the water table. Estimates suggest that approximately a billion gallons of groundwater have already been contaminated with 5 megacuries of radionuclides. The neighboring Norwegians are understandably nervous that some of the pollution could find its way into their water supply, or even into the Arctic Ocean.

Russia has long been fond of producing the most massive specimens of military might: the monstrous Tsar Cannon, the 200-ton Tsar Bell, the cumbersome Tsar Tank, and the 50-megaton Tsar Bomba. In that “biggest-ever” tradition, the Mayak Chemical Combine is now credited by the Worldwatch Institute as the creator of the “most polluted spot” in history, a mess whose true magnitude is yet to be known.
"Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:21 pm

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Petition to Congress:

"Raise wages and fight inequality by supporting organized labor. Pass the Protecting the Right to Organize Act."
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Thu Jul 18, 2019 8:32 pm

Today, the House of Representatives passed the Raise the Wage Act, which would raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025. This is thanks to your hard work, and that of our allies, demanding that working people receive a fair return on our work. And EPI was at the center of the battle, running the numbers and providing the data to fuel the fight at every step of the way.

It’s been 10 years since Congress last raised the minimum wage―the longest stretch in history. And finally, we are making progress....

Over the last decade, a $7.25 minimum wage has lost purchasing power to the tune of 17 percent. That translates to a loss of more than $3,000 in annual earnings for a full-time, year-round minimum wage worker.


The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a report recently assessing the economic impact of a $15 minimum wage. They found that millions would get a raise, inequality would go down, and 1.3 million people would be lifted out of poverty.

In addition to raising the minimum wage, the Raise the Wage Act would index the minimum wage to match changes in the national median wage―so the minimum wage doesn’t fall behind again.

Thank you for all that you do to raise the wages of all working people.

In solidarity,

Thea Lee
President, EPI Policy Center
SIGN NOW: TELL MITCH McCONNELL IT’S TIME TO RAISE THE FEDERAL MINIMUM WAGE TO $15 AN HOUR!
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by O Really » Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:18 pm

No good news out of new DOL Secretary Scalia...

Trump Labor Pick Scalia Seen As Deregulatory Force
By Braden Campbell

Law360 (July 19, 2019, 7:45 PM EDT) -- Years spent challenging rules issued by the U.S. Department of Labor and other federal agencies have made Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP attorney and George W. Bush DOL veteran Eugene Scalia — the president’s planned pick to helm the DOL — a lean, mean, deregulating machine.

Scalia, the son of the late Justice Antonin Scalia and co-chair of Gibson Dunn’s administrative law and regulatory practice, has played a leading role in management-side efforts to derail a number of worker protection rules, from the Clinton administration’s ergonomics rule in the '90s to former President Barack Obama’s fiduciary rule in recent years.


Eugene Scalia
Challenges The Rules


President Trump's nominee for Labor secretary has built a career challenging — and often defeating — federal regulations in the courts.

The Fiduciary Rule
Arguing for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Scalia persuaded the Fifth Circuit to wipe out a DOL rule making retirement investment brokers put clients’ interests before their own.

The Ergonomics Rule
Scalia faced heavy criticism in his last confirmation go-round over his opposition to a Clinton administration regulation aimed at protecting workers from repetitive stress injuries.

The Tip-Pool Rule
Scalia represented casino magnate Steve Wynn in litigation opposing a DOL regulation blocking the pooling of tips with non-tipped workers in the hospitality industry.

The Cooperative Compliance Program
In another case for the Chamber, Scalia convinced the D.C. Circuit to nix a DOL workplace safety program under the Administrative Procedure Act.

Proxy Access and Resource Extraction Rules
Scalia successfully led two business challenges to Securities and Exchange Commission rules issued under the Dodd-Frank reforms.

It’s a resume that has him well-prepared to lead the Trump administration’s efforts to lighten the regulatory burden on employers, to the thrill of the business community and the dismay of workers’ advocates, they say.

“If you want somebody to speed up deregulation, Gene Scalia may well be your man,” said National Employment Law Project Senior Counsel Patricia Smith, who clashed with Scalia as solicitor of labor during the Obama administration.

President Donald Trump announced plans to nominate Scalia on Thursday, a little less than a week after outgoing Labor Secretary Alex Acosta said he would step down amid criticism for his role in brokering a plea deal with accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein. The president touted Scalia’s “great success in the legal and labor field” in a tweet, saying Scalia will be “a great member” of his administration.

Business advocates praised the pick Friday, among them the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which Scalia has represented in a handful of legal challenges, and the Retail Industry Leaders Association, whose chief operating officer called Scalia “a gifted attorney and a thoughtful and effective expert in labor and workforce policy.”

NELP’s Smith struck a different tone, while acknowledging Scalia as a dogged advocate for his clients’ interests. It’s a troubling trait when that client is Donald Trump, she said.

Smith, who led the New York State Department of Labor before heading to Washington, recalled attending a public hearing on the ergonomics rule, which imposed new workplace standards aimed at reducing repetitive motion injuries.

Smith had commented on the plan along with then-New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who testified. She said Spitzer faced blistering examination by Scalia, who represented opposed businesses, over what Scalia viewed as the “phony science” behind the plan. The grilling led the AG to say Scalia should instead quiz his brother, a neurosurgeon.

“Of course, our comments had been limited to the [plan’s] effect on state workers’ compensation programs,” she said.

Former President George W. Bush nominated Scalia to be solicitor of labor — the DOL’s top legal post — in 2001 and ultimately advance him for a brief stint in the job via a recess appointment.

Scalia resumed his work pestering regulators after leaving public service in the mid-2000s, and would become one of the Obama administration’s top legal foes, most recently in the employment space. In 2018, Scalia won a Fifth Circuit ruling killing the Obama DOL’s “fiduciary rule,” which made retirement investment brokers act in their clients’ best interests, and mounted a U.S. Supreme Court challenge to new limits on tip pooling, but the bid was mooted when lawmakers and the Trump DOL struck a deal rolling back parts of the rule.

Scalia’s backers say this vast experience opposing regulations will come in handy for him should he be confirmed as labor secretary, a role in which he would guide and defend the DOL’s rulemaking. His nomination is well-timed with the DOL now in the thick of three high-profile wage and hour rulemakings, said Glenn Spencer, senior vice president of employment policy with the Chamber.

The windows for public comment recently closed on the DOL’s planned revisions to rules governing who gets overtime, when employers can be held jointly liable for violations against the same group of workers, and what non-wage payments employers can omit when calculating the base rate they multiply to find workers’ overtime wages, all of which the administration has classified as deregulatory actions. Scalia’s expertise will be “a real asset” as the DOL works to finalize those rules, Spencer said.

“He knows labor law like few other people do,” Spencer said.

Business-side policy advocates have urged the DOL to issue these rules in forms that will withstand scrutiny in court. It’s a task the Trump administration has so far struggled with, but one Scalia is well-equipped to carry out by virtue of his work spearheading legal challenges, said Seyfarth Shaw LLP government relations practice head Randel Johnson.

“He knows what goes into defending a regulation because he’s been on the other side, challenging regulations,” said Johnson, a Chamber veteran who fought the ergonomics rule with Scalia. “What comes out of DOL is going to be very defensible in court.”

Should he be confirmed, Scalia will take over for newly minted Acting Secretary Patrick Pizzella, whose recent appointment drew unanimous howls from workers’ advocates. Their reaction to Trump’s plan to nominate Scalia has been more mixed.

Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, who opposed Scalia’s 2001 nomination to be labor solicitor and now serves as the top-ranking Democrat on the Senate labor committee, said Scalia is “still the wrong choice.” Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, suggested Friday that he would withhold judgment until after a confirmation hearing, despite reservations about Scalia’s seeming “support for unchecked corporate power and neglect of the welfare of working people.”

Smith, Obama’s labor solicitor, likewise signaled caution.

“[The DOL's] mission in statute is to protect America’s workforce, and he has, in private practice, sort of been the go-to person for the Chamber of Commerce,” Smith said. “We hope that he would as secretary understand that that’s the mission.”

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:26 pm

Like father like son


Ulysses may be interested in Fat Tony's son's take on the Ergonomics Rule
George Carlin said “The owners know the truth. It’s called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.”

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue Jul 30, 2019 3:34 pm

O Really wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:18 pm
No good news out of new DOL Secretary Scalia...

Trump Labor Pick Scalia Seen As Deregulatory Force
By Braden Campbell

...
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:26 pm
Like father like son

Ulysses may be interested in Fat Tony's son's take on the Ergonomics Rule
Image

Petition to the Senate:

"Oppose Eugene Scalia's nomination as secretary of Labor."
Speaking of Rudy, WTF?

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:09 am

O Really wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:18 pm
No good news out of new DOL Secretary Scalia...

Trump Labor Pick Scalia Seen As Deregulatory Force
By Braden Campbell

...
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:26 pm
Like father like son

Ulysses may be interested in Fat Tony's son's take on the Ergonomics Rule
EPI: Why Eugene Scalia is the wrong person for the job
Speaking of Rudy, WTF?

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Wed Aug 28, 2019 12:04 pm

DoorDash is still pocketing workers’ tips, almost a month after it promised to stop
It’s been almost a month since the delivery company promised workers it would offer details about its new tipping policy “in the coming days.”
I received an email yesterday from the Communications Workers of America asking me to "Support 20,000 Workers on Strike at AT&T". When I went to sign the petition:
Victory! The AT&T Southeast strike has ended. CWA members' spirit and solidarity and your support showed the company that we would not stop until they bargained in good faith. Thank you!
:---P
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by neoplacebo » Wed Aug 28, 2019 3:28 pm

The smell of victory over AT&T in the morning is likely nice. :thumbup:

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by O Really » Wed Aug 28, 2019 4:25 pm

neoplacebo wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 3:28 pm
The smell of victory over AT&T in the morning is likely nice. :thumbup:
I don't know about "victory." Used to be unions would go into contract negotiations with a long wish list ...better benefits, more money, faster horses, older whisky, younger women, whatever. Now these guys are (were) on strike mostly just to avoid losing more than they have already.

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by neoplacebo » Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:46 pm

O Really wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 4:25 pm
neoplacebo wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 3:28 pm
The smell of victory over AT&T in the morning is likely nice. :thumbup:
I don't know about "victory." Used to be unions would go into contract negotiations with a long wish list ...better benefits, more money, faster horses, older whisky, younger women, whatever. Now these guys are (were) on strike mostly just to avoid losing more than they have already.
Well, I suppose it's a pyrrhic victory; in another twenty years or less there won't be any labor unions.

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Vrede too
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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Fri Aug 30, 2019 1:11 am

Email:
... Whether it’s the federal minimum wage that’s lost 31% of its value over the last 50 years, or attacks on labor unions vastly reducing the share of workers covered by a union contract, the policy decisions coming out of Washington have not resulted in broadly shared economic growth....

As EPI’s Heidi Shierholz writes:

“Impeding union representation has been a primary goal of corporate interests in recent decades, and these interests have convinced conservative policymakers to attack collective bargaining through legislation, executive rulemaking, and the courts.”

Indeed, the evidence is clear that President Trump and conservatives in Congress have expended no real effort in helping generate wage growth for most workers, but have done plenty that will make it harder for workers to see wage gains in the future. Here are just a few anti-worker policies Trump was able to push through a Republican-controlled Congress in 2017 and 2018:

1) Enacting tax cuts that overwhelmingly favor the wealthy over the average worker.
2) Taking billions out of workers’ pockets by weakening or abandoning regulations that protect their pay.
3) Blocking workers from access to the courts by allowing mandatory arbitration clauses in employment contracts.
4) Pushing immigration policies that hurt all workers.
5) Rolling back regulations that protect worker pay and safety....
Speaking of Rudy, WTF?

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Mon Sep 02, 2019 9:33 pm

Speaking of Rudy, WTF?

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Re: The Worker Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:19 am

Happy day after Labor Day!

Take action to safeguard farmworker protections!
The Department of Labor is now accepting public comment on their proposed changes.


Raising the federal minimum wage isn’t just the right thing to do for workers—it’s also good for the economy

Don’t be fooled by the Trump administration’s Labor Day pitch on overtime policy—it’s going to cost workers billions
It’s not just noncompetes—increased use of anti-competitive contracts has limited workers’ bargaining power and employers’ hiring power

During the 2019 legislative session, lawmakers in a number of states including Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Washington passed laws limiting employers’ ability to impose noncompetition agreements (noncompetes) on low and middle-income workers. Noncompetes have traditionally been used to protect highly confidential information or trade secrets, and the trend to restrict them is in part a response to outrageous examples of employer overuse of noncompetes to prevent very low-wage workers like sandwich makers and security guards and even no-wage workers like unpaid summer interns from going to work for competitors. These new laws are important steps to safeguard employees’ ability to move jobs and employers’ ability to hire qualified candidates.

Yet while noncompetes matter tremendously, they are only one part of a larger story about how anti-competitive contracts—sometimes not even disclosed to workers themselves—are negatively impacting workers’ wages and mobility in our economy....
Speaking of Rudy, WTF?

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