College sports

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Vrede too
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Re: College sports

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:20 pm
Things do change.

This from a 1916 game

Several players "suffered serious injuries during the game, including quarterback Edwards, who was thrice carted off with concussions."

Hey, you've only had 2 concussions, get back in there.
Edwards went on to become Herbert Hoover's top economic advisor.
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Re: College sports

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Vrede too wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 7:44 pm
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:20 pm
Things do change.

This from a 1916 game

Several players "suffered serious injuries during the game, including quarterback Edwards, who was thrice carted off with concussions."

Hey, you've only had 2 concussions, get back in there.
Edwards went on to become Herbert Hoover's top economic advisor.

John Heisman caused the Great Depression

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Re: College sports

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 8:24 pm
John Heisman caused the Great Depression
Asshole.

Figures:
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Re: College sports

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Vrede too wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 8:30 pm
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 8:24 pm
John Heisman caused the Great Depression
Asshole.

Figures:
Never knew the field was 110 yards, or that anyone has ever made a 109 yard punt.

in the snow, in a game during which Tennessee's Toots Douglas launched a 109-yard punt (the field length was 110 yards in those days).[91][92]


Toots went on to command the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga.

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Re: College sports

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:51 am
Never knew the field was 110 yards, or that anyone has ever made a 109 yard punt.

in the snow, in a game during which Tennessee's Toots Douglas launched a 109-yard punt (the field length was 110 yards in those days).[91][92]
Nor I.
Toots went on to command the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga.
The Saratoga was hit by a torpedo 11 January 1942, a month into the war. Temporary repairs at Pearl Harbor, then more extensive repairs at the Bremerton (WA) Navy Yard. "Douglas was relieved on 12 April ..."

Opps.

Archibald Hugh "Toots" "Tootsie" Douglas' Wiki page says this about his Navy career:
... distinguished veteran of World War II.[1] He once commanded the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga. He also served in World War I, as part of the Northern Bombing Group.
That's it. Must have been those concussions ;) .

In contrast, the section on the punt is pure poetry:
Football

Douglas was once a prominent running back for the Tennessee Volunteers football teams of the University of Tennessee.

1902

The 1902 Volunteers won a school record six games and beat rivals Sewanee and Georgia Tech. 1902 was also the first time that Tennessee scored on Vanderbilt in their Rivalry game. The team closed the season with an 11 to 0 loss to John Heisman's Clemson Tigers. Douglas holds the record for the longest punt in school history when he punted a ball 109 yards (the field length was 110 yards in those days) during the Clemson game. Heisman described the kick:

The day was bitterly cold and a veritable typhoon was blowing straight down the field from one end to the other. We rushed the ball with more consistency than Tennessee, but throughout the entire first half they held us because of the superb punting of "Toots" Douglas, especially because, in that period he had the gale squarely with him. Going against that blizzard our labors were like unto those of Tantalus. Slowly, with infinite pains and a maximum of exertion, we pushed the ball from our territory to their 10-yard line. We figured we had another down to draw on, but the referee begged to differ. He handed the ball to Tennessee and the "tornado." Their general cheerfully chirped a signal – Saxe Crawford, it must have been –; and "Toots" with sprightly step, dropped back for another of his Milky Way punts. I visualize him still, standing on his own goal line and squarely between his uprights. One quick glance he cast overhead– no doubt to make sure that howling was still the same old hurricane.

I knew at once what he proposed to do. The snap was perfect. "Toots" caught the ball, took two smart steps and – BLAM!–away shot the ball as though from the throat of Big Bertha. And, say, in his palmiest mathematical mood, I don't believe Sir Isaac Newton himself could have figured a more perfect trajectory to fit with that cyclone. Onward and upward, upward and onward, the crazy thing flew like a brainchild of Jules Verne. I thought it would clear the Blue Ridge Mountains. Our safety man, the great Johnny Maxwell, was positioned 50 yards behind our rush line, yet the punt sailed over his head like a phantom aeroplane. Finally, it came down, but still uncured of its wanderlust it started in to roll–toward our goal, of course, with Maxwell chasing and damning it with every step and breath. Finally it curled up and died on our one-footline, after a bowstring journey of just 109 yards.


In the loss to Vanderbilt, Tennessee's only score was provided by an A. H. Douglas run around right end, breaking two tackles and getting the touchdown. Douglas was selected All-Southern....
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Re: College sports

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Vrede too wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:44 am
billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:51 am
Never knew the field was 110 yards, or that anyone has ever made a 109 yard punt.

in the snow, in a game during which Tennessee's Toots Douglas launched a 109-yard punt (the field length was 110 yards in those days).[91][92]
Nor I.
Toots went on to command the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga.
The Saratoga was hit by a torpedo 11 January 1942, a month into the war. Temporary repairs at Pearl Harbor, then more extensive repairs at the Bremerton (WA) Navy Yard. "Douglas was relieved on 12 April ..."

Opps.

Archibald Hugh "Toots" "Tootsie" Douglas' Wiki page says this about his Navy career:
... distinguished veteran of World War II.[1] He once commanded the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga. He also served in World War I, as part of the Northern Bombing Group.
That's it. Must have been those concussions ;) .

In contrast, the section on the punt is pure poetry:
Football

Douglas was once a prominent running back for the Tennessee Volunteers football teams of the University of Tennessee.

1902

The 1902 Volunteers won a school record six games and beat rivals Sewanee and Georgia Tech. 1902 was also the first time that Tennessee scored on Vanderbilt in their Rivalry game. The team closed the season with an 11 to 0 loss to John Heisman's Clemson Tigers. Douglas holds the record for the longest punt in school history when he punted a ball 109 yards (the field length was 110 yards in those days) during the Clemson game. Heisman described the kick:

The day was bitterly cold and a veritable typhoon was blowing straight down the field from one end to the other. We rushed the ball with more consistency than Tennessee, but throughout the entire first half they held us because of the superb punting of "Toots" Douglas, especially because, in that period he had the gale squarely with him. Going against that blizzard our labors were like unto those of Tantalus. Slowly, with infinite pains and a maximum of exertion, we pushed the ball from our territory to their 10-yard line. We figured we had another down to draw on, but the referee begged to differ. He handed the ball to Tennessee and the "tornado." Their general cheerfully chirped a signal – Saxe Crawford, it must have been –; and "Toots" with sprightly step, dropped back for another of his Milky Way punts. I visualize him still, standing on his own goal line and squarely between his uprights. One quick glance he cast overhead– no doubt to make sure that howling was still the same old hurricane.

I knew at once what he proposed to do. The snap was perfect. "Toots" caught the ball, took two smart steps and – BLAM!–away shot the ball as though from the throat of Big Bertha. And, say, in his palmiest mathematical mood, I don't believe Sir Isaac Newton himself could have figured a more perfect trajectory to fit with that cyclone. Onward and upward, upward and onward, the crazy thing flew like a brainchild of Jules Verne. I thought it would clear the Blue Ridge Mountains. Our safety man, the great Johnny Maxwell, was positioned 50 yards behind our rush line, yet the punt sailed over his head like a phantom aeroplane. Finally, it came down, but still uncured of its wanderlust it started in to roll–toward our goal, of course, with Maxwell chasing and damning it with every step and breath. Finally it curled up and died on our one-footline, after a bowstring journey of just 109 yards.


In the loss to Vanderbilt, Tennessee's only score was provided by an A. H. Douglas run around right end, breaking two tackles and getting the touchdown. Douglas was selected All-Southern....

The way I read this, the punt was on 1st down.

Shut occasionally punted on 3rd, but this is the only 1st down punt I am aware of

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Re: College sports

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:54 am
The way I read this, the punt was on 1st down.

Shut occasionally punted on 3rd, but this is the only 1st down punt I am aware of
"11 to 0 loss to John Heisman's Clemson Tigers."
May have been their best weapon for gaining field position.

Alabama confirms hip dislocation will end Tua Tagovailoa’s season

Even for a Bama-hater like me, that's too bad. Ankle not fully healed contributed? The commenters are trashing Saban.

Article still featured on NBC website:

No. 13 Baylor takes huge lead over No. 10 Oklahoma to locker room

:lol: :---P
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Re: College sports

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Opps, wrong topic, moved to College football.
Last edited by Vrede too on Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:06 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: College sports

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Minnesota :lol:

They're a little better than Mary-land though.
Ohio State 73 Turds 14

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Re: College sports

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Rex Ryan trashes Big Ten in College Football Playoff race

Don’t ever put Penn State ahead of Clemson, for the love of God. And the guys from Minnesota, row your boat down there to Clemson and get beat by 40. Stop it already.
https://247sports.com/Article/College-f ... HGpZjyRBsM

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Re: College sports

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O Really wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:55 pm
rstrong wrote:Chowan College in Murfreesboro, North Carolina and later North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, NCAA competitors of the University of North Carolina.

.
:lol:
Sure - in the same way that Northwest Calgary Tech is a "competitor" of McGill.
Speaking of competition:
WSU now has TWO of Dennis Rodman’s kids wearing crimson and gray

WASHINGTON STATE HAS hauled in one of the biggest soccer recruits in the country, the school said in a release. Trinity Rodman also happens to be the daughter of Dennis Rodman – and the second child of the NBA legend to head to WSU, after true freshman D.J. Rodman joined the Cougar basketball team this fall.

Rodman, the top-ranked forward in the 2020 class and the highest rated recruit in program history, is the ninth new Cougar to sign a National Letter of Intent with WSU for the upcoming season....

Rodman this season has been a force on the club level playing for So Cal Blue alongside of fellow Coug recruits Lynette Hernaez and Marin Whieldon. The trio helped lead their team to the 2019 ECNL National Championship in June at the U-19 level. Rodman has led the Blues to a 10-0 start and a plus-44 goal differential in the ECNL this season as they look to defend their national title. She was named a 2019 United Soccer Coaches Youth Girls All-American for the second time in November.

Rodman also has extensive international experience having played throughout the US National Team system. Most recently she played with the U-20 team in the Nike Invitational Friendlies alongside future Cougar teammate Mykiaa Minniss. The duo helped lead Team USA past the European champion French squad as Rodman assisted on the opening goal of the game and scored the game-winner in the tournament's finale....
Ut-oh.
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Re: College sports

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Who’s highest‐paid in your state?

State-by-state breakdown

Who's the most powerful person in your state? Well, based on public employee salaries, it's likely a college coach (sorry, governors). A whopping 28 college football coaches are the best-paid employees in their states, along with 12 college hoops coaches who top the state payrolls. Check out the map below to find your state's top-earning public official, plus the governor's salary.

(interactive map)

North Carolina
Roy Williams, UNC men's basketball coach $3.3M
Roy Cooper, governor $144.4K
Median household income in dollars $52,752
Number of median income people needed to match Williams' salary 63

Money men

Notice any familiar names on this list of the 40 highest-paid coaches at public colleges? You should -- Nick Saban, Dabo Swinney and Jim Harbaugh have been on it for years. But some others (hello, Dan Hurley) crack the list for the first time.

Dabo Swinney, Clemson $9.3M
John Calipari, Kentucky $9.3M (hoops)
Nick Saban, Alabama $8.9M
Jim Harbaugh, Michigan $7.5M
Jimbo Fisher, Texas A&M $7.5M
Kirby Smart, Georgia $6.9M
Jeff Brohm, Purdue $6.6M (unranked)
Lincoln Riley, Oklahoma $6.4M
Dan Mullen, Florida $6.1M
James Franklin, Penn State $5.7M

(more at link)
UNC is not just unranked, it did not receive a single AP vote.
http://scores.nbcsports.com/cbk/polls.asp?poll=AP

Coaches are not tops in the Northeast, DE, ND, MT, AK & HI.
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Re: College sports

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A complex problem that we've discussed and I don't have a favored solution for, one perspective:

College athletes and Ph.D. students both work for the university, but only one earns a salary
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Re: College sports

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Vrede too wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:24 pm
A complex problem that we've discussed and I don't have a favored solution for, one perspective:

College athletes and Ph.D. students both work for the university, but only one earns a salary

I have come around to paying athletes, but this is the worst example I have seen for why they should be paid.
graduate assistants getting paid to teach classes is very different than football practice.

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Re: College sports

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 5:44 pm
I have come around to paying athletes, but this is the worst example I have seen for why they should be paid.
graduate assistants getting paid to teach classes is very different than football practice.
I'm not there yet with solutions, but the premise that both college athletes and Ph.D. students create value for the schools seems valid to me. Isn't that the fundamental for who should be paid and not?
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Re: College sports

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I'm for paying players and letting them exploit their personal name, image, and reputation, but just for entertainment, I could offer another view. For the schools to owe students money, the students would have to be under some form of agreement to provide services for the employer, the school. Those services could be either as an employee or as a contractor, using the legal definitions of those terms. So we can have a given that the students have an agreement to play a sport, but the questions would arise, is playing a sport "providing services" and for whose benefit are the services performed? It's not enough that the school simply earns money from the activity. The activity has to be a part of the employer's business, requiring it to "hire" people to perform. I think it could be argued that a sports team is no different from any other competition that the school might allow students to participate in, or that they may sponsor. They are all called "extracurricular" activities - outside the formal learning experience, but still beneficial to overall education goals. Of course, the school doesn't make much money over the national success of its chess club, or tennis, or even 19 national titles in womens' soccer, but other than the money, everyone in sport is providing the same service. It could also be argued that the athletes who are deemed to be important enough to be providing a service to the school are being adequately compensated with their scholarships. And that certainly is valuable, but doesn't do much for living expenses.

Ehhhh, this isn't working. Schools make millions off their major programs and they couldn't do it without the participant athletes. Give them a share of the pot.

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