POTUSes

Generally an unmoderated forum for discussion of pretty much any topic. The focus however, is usually politics.
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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Supporter to Obama: "I love you!"
Obama to Supporter : "I love you back!"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQ-5kOHoRAo
Supporter to Trump : "I love you!"
Trump to Supporter : "I love me, too!"

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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I've heard a couple of pundits say that only 3 US presidents have lost a second term, but they must have said something like 'since WW2' and I missed it.
How many US presidents have lost a second term? All the one-term presidents
Only ten presidents have failed to win re-election


... Of the 44 who have held office, only ten presidents have failed to win re-election for a second term, when they have attempted to.

One US president, John F Kennedy was assassinated before he could run for re-election.

The longest period the US has experienced without a president failing to complete two terms, was between 1932 and 1976....

John Adams

... He came third in the next election, behind the two candidates the Republican party ran, with Thomas Jefferson eventually becoming the new US president.

John Quincy Adams
No sequels for The Adams Family.
Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Harrison

Martin Van Buren
was the next president to fail to win re-election in 1840, but Grover Cleveland proved that a lost election does not stop you from getting your second term.

Mr Cleveland, a Democrat, was the 22nd and the 24th president of the United States, after he won both the 1884 and 1892 elections.

He won the popular vote in 1888, but lost the election to the Republican Benjamin Harrison, who served for the next four years.

The 1888 election was tight and in 1892, Mr Cleveland defeated Mr Harrison, to win back the presidency and cause Mr Harrison to become the fifth president to fail to win re-election.

William Howard Taft

... He served as president from 1909 to 1913 and lost the 1912 presidential election to Woodrow Wilson.

Herbert Hoover

... His presidency was overshadowed by the economic crash in 1929, and he spent most of his one term attempting to improve the country’s economy.

The US had not recovered by the time of the 1932 election, and he lost to Franklin D Roosevelt.

Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter

Gerald Ford not only failed to win re-election as the US president, but also never won a presidential election.

Mr Ford, a Republican, became the president after Richard Nixon resigned, following the Watergate scandal.

He served from 1974 to 1977, when Jimmy Carter defeated him in the 1976 election.

Mr Carter, a Democrat served as the US president from 1977 to 1981, but lost the 1980 election to Ronald Reagan.

Despite the fact Gerald Ford never won a presidential election, Mr Carter’s loss, meant that for the first time, two US presidents in succession failed to win re-election.

George H W Bush

George H W Bush was the last president to fail to win re-election, when he was beaten by Democrat, Bill Clinton, in the 1992 election....
Read my lips, no second term.

45SHOLE will be the 11th.

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Fwiw, more Americans have now voted for the Dem than have voted for the Repug in 7 of the last 8 POTUS elections.

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Does PINO's post-election tantrum make it more likely that the Biden admin and others will pursue criminal charges against him and his co-conspirators?

I hope so.

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GoCubsGo
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Re: POTUSes

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:laughing-rofl: :-H

Image
Eamus Catuli~AC 000000 000101 010202 020303 010304 020405....Ahhhh, forget it, it's gonna be a while.

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billy.pilgrim
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Re: POTUSes

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_ ... ntial_pets

Looks like they all had pets except for Polk and trump.
Trump: “We had the safest border in the history of our country - or at least recorded history. I guess maybe a thousand years ago it was even better.”

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Image

:laughing-rofl:

More trashing of whiny, moronic, PINO-pardoned campaign finance felon D'Souza:
https://www.reddit.com/r/MurderedByWord ... f_the_man/

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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President Obama’s High School Jersey Auction Breaks Record

1978-79, HI state champ.
$192K!
LeBron's high school jersey in 2019: $187.5K

GOAT.

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neoplacebo
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Re: POTUSes

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Oh, shit, something else for the whiner in chief to whine about.

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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neoplacebo wrote:
Wed Dec 09, 2020 7:36 am
Oh, shit, something else for the whiner in chief to whine about.
Let's give him some more.
Exclusive: As Trump leaves office, 50% of Americans say he'll be seen as 'failed' president

... Asked how history would judge Trump's presidency, 16% predict he will be seen as a great president, 13% as a good president, 16% as a fair president, and 50% as a failed president. Five percent are undecided....

Trump's ratings are more sharply negative than the ones Barack Obama, himself a controversial president, received when he left office four years ago. Then, a USA TODAY/Suffolk Poll found that half of Americans predicted history would view Obama in a positive light, with 18% calling him a great president and 32% a good one. Twenty-three percent called him a failed president....

While Americans by an overwhelming 70%-26% say it is time for Trump to concede the election now that the Electoral College has voted, Republicans by double digits, 57%-37%, say he shouldn't.

Indeed, most Republicans are ready to vote for Trump again. If he is the party's nominee in 2024, 71% of Republicans say they would support him, and another 16% say they would consider it. Just 10% say they wouldn't.

That gives Trump the standing to dominate the GOP's direction in a way no losing presidential nominee has done in modern times.

But Republicans aren't convinced Trump, in the end, will run again. While 48% predict he will be the party's nominee in four years, 35% say he won't....

By 62%-37%, Americans believe Biden was legitimately elected president. The fact that more than a third of the electorate – including 78% of Republicans – say he didn't legitimately win the office looms as a significant political hurdle, particularly for a president who will take office during a deadly pandemic and an economy in upheaval....

In some ways, Biden's standing has improved since his election. By 20 points, 51%-31%, those surveyed approve of the job he has done since the election. His favorable-unfavorable rating is now a net 10 points positive, 49%-39%. In comparison, Trump's is 15 points negative, 40%-55%....

By 66%-27%, those surveyed predict Biden will significantly dismantle Trump's legacy, a view held across party lines. (The finding was similar to the expectation in 2016, 59%-30%, that Trump would dismantle Obama's legacy.)

Views of the wisdom of doing that weren't bipartisan, though. Among Democrats, 79% said dismantling Trump's legacy would be "a good thing," while 72% of Republicans said it would be "a bad thing." Still, nearly 1 in 5 Republicans, 18%, said it would be "a good thing." ...

By 66%-24%, Americans say he should attend the inauguration of his successor next month. There is little partisan differences on that question: 65% of Democrats and 62% of Republicans say he should attend.

By 62%-25%, those surveyed say it would be an abuse of a president's powers if Trump issues a preemptive pardon for himself. But most Republicans, 56%-24%, say it would be an appropriate use of his power.

By 58%-29%, respondents say it would be an abuse of his power to issue a significant number of pardons for his children, top aides and others.

When Trump took office four years ago, 59% told the USA TODAY poll that the country's divisions were deeper than they had been in the past. That view has only intensified. Now, 67% say the divisions have gotten deeper. It's a view held by overwhelming majorities across party lines.

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neoplacebo
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Re: POTUSes

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Yep, the cult gushes in awe and the rest of us wonder why.

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billy.pilgrim
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Re: POTUSes

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Vrede too wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 4:55 pm
neoplacebo wrote:
Wed Dec 09, 2020 7:36 am
Oh, shit, something else for the whiner in chief to whine about.
Let's give him some more.
Exclusive: As Trump leaves office, 50% of Americans say he'll be seen as 'failed' president

... Asked how history would judge Trump's presidency, 16% predict he will be seen as a great president, 13% as a good president, 16% as a fair president, and 50% as a failed president. Five percent are undecided....

Trump's ratings are more sharply negative than the ones Barack Obama, himself a controversial president, received when he left office four years ago. Then, a USA TODAY/Suffolk Poll found that half of Americans predicted history would view Obama in a positive light, with 18% calling him a great president and 32% a good one. Twenty-three percent called him a failed president....

While Americans by an overwhelming 70%-26% say it is time for Trump to concede the election now that the Electoral College has voted, Republicans by double digits, 57%-37%, say he shouldn't.

Indeed, most Republicans are ready to vote for Trump again. If he is the party's nominee in 2024, 71% of Republicans say they would support him, and another 16% say they would consider it. Just 10% say they wouldn't.

That gives Trump the standing to dominate the GOP's direction in a way no losing presidential nominee has done in modern times.

But Republicans aren't convinced Trump, in the end, will run again. While 48% predict he will be the party's nominee in four years, 35% say he won't....

By 62%-37%, Americans believe Biden was legitimately elected president. The fact that more than a third of the electorate – including 78% of Republicans – say he didn't legitimately win the office looms as a significant political hurdle, particularly for a president who will take office during a deadly pandemic and an economy in upheaval....

In some ways, Biden's standing has improved since his election. By 20 points, 51%-31%, those surveyed approve of the job he has done since the election. His favorable-unfavorable rating is now a net 10 points positive, 49%-39%. In comparison, Trump's is 15 points negative, 40%-55%....

By 66%-27%, those surveyed predict Biden will significantly dismantle Trump's legacy, a view held across party lines. (The finding was similar to the expectation in 2016, 59%-30%, that Trump would dismantle Obama's legacy.)

Views of the wisdom of doing that weren't bipartisan, though. Among Democrats, 79% said dismantling Trump's legacy would be "a good thing," while 72% of Republicans said it would be "a bad thing." Still, nearly 1 in 5 Republicans, 18%, said it would be "a good thing." ...

By 66%-24%, Americans say he should attend the inauguration of his successor next month. There is little partisan differences on that question: 65% of Democrats and 62% of Republicans say he should attend.

By 62%-25%, those surveyed say it would be an abuse of a president's powers if Trump issues a preemptive pardon for himself. But most Republicans, 56%-24%, say it would be an appropriate use of his power.

By 58%-29%, respondents say it would be an abuse of his power to issue a significant number of pardons for his children, top aides and others.

When Trump took office four years ago, 59% told the USA TODAY poll that the country's divisions were deeper than they had been in the past. That view has only intensified. Now, 67% say the divisions have gotten deeper. It's a view held by overwhelming majorities across party lines.
And the other 50% want to name roads, bridges, add his face to mt. Rushmore,
change Lee's face to trump's at Stone Mtn and honor him at all of our 18th century airports.
Trump: “We had the safest border in the history of our country - or at least recorded history. I guess maybe a thousand years ago it was even better.”

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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billy.pilgrim wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 5:54 pm
And the other 50% want to name roads, bridges, add his face to mt. Rushmore, change Lee's face to trump's at Stone Mtn and honor him at all of our 18th century airports.
Any adoration is sick, but it's not that bad.
Vrede too wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 4:55 pm
... Asked how history would judge Trump's presidency, 16% predict he will be seen as a great president, 13% as a good president, 16% as a fair president, and 50% as a failed president. Five percent are undecided....

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O Really
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Re: POTUSes

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Vrede too wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 7:26 pm
Vrede too wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 4:55 pm
... Asked how history would judge Trump's presidency, 16% predict he will be seen as a great president, 13% as a good president, 16% as a fair president, and 50% as a failed president. Five percent are undecided....
In a related survey, 45% were found to be clueless and 5% were found to be catatonic.

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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O Really wrote:
Thu Dec 24, 2020 7:38 pm
In a related survey, 45% were found to be clueless and 5% were found to be catatonic.
:thumbup:

Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter won't attend Biden's inauguration

Former President Jimmy Carter and former first lady Rosalynn Carter will not attend President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. It marks the first time the couple, 96 and 93, will have missed the ceremonies since Carter was sworn in as the 39th president in 1977.

A spokeswoman at The Carter Center in Atlanta said the Carters have sent Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris their “best wishes” and “look forward to a successful administration.”

Biden was a young Delaware senator and Carter ally during the Georgian’s term in the White House.

The Carters have spent the coronavirus pandemic mostly at their home in Plains, Georgia, where both were raised and where they returned after leaving the White House in 1981.

Separately, former President George W. Bush and his wife Laura will attend the inauguration in person. Their spokesman, Freddy Ford, said, “President and Mrs. Bush look forward to returning to the Capitol for the swearing in of President Biden and Vice President Harris.” ...
Good for the Shrubbery and perfectly understandable for the ancient Carters. It's very weird that the article doesn't mention the Clintons' and Obamas' plans - presumably attending.

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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How many presidents have boycotted successors’ inauguration and who are they?

... Mr Trump will be the first US president since Andrew Johnson in 1869 to boycott a successor’s inauguration, and only the fourth to do so.

Johnson, who became president after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln in 1865, was so unpopular with his own party that he was impeached by the House of Represenatives, and went on to lose the 1864 election to Ulysses S. Grant.
Fitting predecessor.
... John Adams (in 1801) and his son John Quincy Adams (in 1829) also stayed away as their successors were sworn-in, after election contests that were widely considered to be low points - even by today’s standards.

Adams, the second US president and first to lose an election, simply refused to attend the inauguration ceremony of Thomas Jefferson in 1801, whose supporters had referred to Adams as “hideous [and] hermaphroditical.”
:o :lol:
But as Mr Balcerski told CNN, “By avoiding Jefferson's inauguration, Adams was perhaps motivated by a desire to cool the political temperature in the capital.”

Adam’s son, John Qunicy Adams, would become the second president to boycott their successors’ inauguration, after an election rematch Andrew Jackson in 1828.
I would have hated to be a loser to Jackson, too.
Two other presidents, Martin Van Buren (in 1841) and Woodrow Wilson (in 1924), were also not seen at their successors’ inaugurations, but those absences are not considered boycotts in the same way.

Historians argue that there was no animosity between Van Buren and William Henry Harrison, and Wilson and Warren G. Harding, with poor health among the reasons.

Van Buren’s son was believed to be ill at the time of his successor’s inauguration, while Wilson rode with his successor to the ceremony, but did not stay, having suffered the effects of a stroke.

Richard Nixon did not attend Gerald Ford's inauguration after Nixon resigned in the middle of his second term in August 1974.

According to the White House Historical Association, “While the sitting president was not there, this occasion was considered a presidential succession and not a traditional inauguration.”
Ford probably insisted that Dick not attend as part of the pardon deal. :)

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Over 1 million more people watched Biden's inauguration than Trump's

... Trump, notoriously obsessed with ratings, was unable to tweet about the news on Thursday following his permanent suspension from the social network.

Here's how the inauguration ratings sorted out among the biggest channels:

CNN cleaned up with 9.9 million viewers on average, more than any other outlet

ABC averaged 7.66 million

NBC News averaged 6.89 million

MSNBC 's average rounded up to 6.53 million

CBS News came in at 6.07 million viewers on average

Fox News came in last with just 2.74 million



...
Po' po' former PINO and Faux Noise.
:---P :---P

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Polls find Biden's approval rating higher than Trump's ever was

... A Morning Consult tracking poll published Monday found that 56 percent of voters approve of Biden’s job performance, while 34 percent disapprove. At the same early juncture of Trump’s presidency, 46 percent of Americans polled said they approved of his job performance, and the polling high point for his term in office came in March 2017, when his approval rating hit 52 percent.

A second poll, conducted by Hill-HarrisX and also released on Monday, put Biden’s approval rating at 63 percent, while 37 percent said they disapprove of the job he was doing so far. Trump, by contrast, reached an approval rating high of 52 percent in an April 2020 survey by the same pollster.

The kickoff to Biden’s presidential term has been marked by a series of executive orders that have aimed to either correct or overturn policies put in place by executive orders signed by Trump, including rejoining the Paris climate accord, rescinding a ban on transgender troops from serving in the U.S. military and lifting a ban on travel to the U.S. from several Muslim and African countries.

In part, the swift reversal of controversial Trump policies has solidified Biden’s standing with his party. The Morning Consult poll found that 91 percent of Democrats approve of Biden’s job performance, compared with just 4 percent of Democrats who disapprove and 5 percent who said they have no opinion. At this same juncture in Trump’s presidency, 83 percent of Republicans said they approved of his job performance.

Biden is also doing better than Trump with independent voters, the Morning Consult poll found. While 49 percent said they approve of Biden’s early job performance, 34 percent said they disapprove. The approval figure is 8 points higher than what Trump notched four years ago....

When Trump began his term as president in January 2017, Gallup measured his approval rating at 45 percent. In early 2020, shortly after the Senate voted to acquit him on impeachment charges, he hit an approval rating high of 49 percent for his presidency. But the week before he left office, his approval had fallen to just 34 percent, and Gallup noted that “his 41% average approval rating throughout his presidency is four points lower than for any of his predecessors.”

Gallup has yet to release its first poll tracking Biden’s approval rating.
:clap: :---P

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Vrede too
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Re: POTUSes

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Who truly was the most dishonest president?

Lots of disturbing and fascinating, to me, details.

George HW Bush - Operation Desert Storm
45SHOLE - At least 30,000 lies on multiple topics
George W Bush - 2nd Gulf War
Lyndon Baines Johnson - Vietnam War +
JFK's brother, Robert Kennedy, once said of LBJ: "He just lies continually about everything. He lies even when he doesn't have to lie.
Richard Nixon - Watergate, "No-one in the White House staff, no-one in this Administration, presently employed, was involved in this very bizarre incident"
George Washington - "I can't tell a lie, Pa," was entirely invented by the president's first biographer. Yorktown
Thomas Jefferson - woolly mammoths
In 1983, President Ronald Reagan claimed he had filmed the atrocities of the Nazi death camps while serving as a US Army Signal Corps photographer in Europe.

He told this story to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir at the White House.

Reagan never left America during World War Two. Few remember this mind-boggling lie.

Many of Trump's comments in the Washington Post catalogue will no doubt prove equally forgettable.

However, one historian argues that the recent tenant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, by the sheer volume of his mendacity, has destroyed the very idea of shared truth in American politics.

"We've tolerated presidential lies ever since the beginning of the republic," says Professor Eric Alterman, author of Lying In State: Why Presidents Lie - And Why Trump Is Worse.

"But Donald Trump is the Frankenstein's monster of a political system that has not merely tolerated lies from our leaders, but has come to demand them."

Prof Alterman says the Capitol rioters, radicalised by conspiracy theories about stolen elections and satanic cabals, underscore the extent to which Trump inspired the "creation of an entire world of unreality".
William Jefferson Clinton - Monica Lewinsky

When presidents misspeak

James Polk
- Mexico "has invaded our territory and shed American blood upon the American soil"
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1940 - "Your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars"
"The world will note that the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, a military base" - Harry Truman in 1945, but the target was actually a city and most of the 140,000 or so people who died were civilians
Dwight Eisenhower - U-2 spy plane
Ronald Reagan - Iran-Contra scandal
Barack Obama - "If you like your healthcare plan, you'll keep your healthcare plan, period"

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O Really
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Re: POTUSes

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As mentioned briefly in the article, some "lies" matter more than others. But it's clear that if the worst they have on Obama is an out of context statement that turned out to be mostly true for most people, then we at least know who the least dishonest President was. And if the worst they have on Clinton is Monica, he must have been pretty honest too, although I used to think his worst lie was "I am not a Republican." I wouldn't count Ike's U-2 denial as a real lie at all, although technically it is. Most of the others are more substantial.

I also think there's a difference in a fundamentally honest person who might occasionally tell a lie and a fundamentally dishonest person who lies as a way of life.

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